exoplanetary first: giant planet around a white dwarf star

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notFritzArgelander
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exoplanetary first: giant planet around a white dwarf star

#1

Post by notFritzArgelander » Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:40 pm

Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80, SV ED80 A f7; Newtonians: Z12 f5; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
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helicon
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Re: exoplanetary first: giant planet around a white dwarf star

#2

Post by helicon » Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:00 pm

One wonders how the planets orbiting this star would have withstood the changes when it went through its red giant phase. Seemingly they would have been vaporized. Somehow one giant planet survived and it is even larger than its host star, and moved into an orbit that is so close that it is astounding. Fascinating stuff notFritz!
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Re: exoplanetary first: giant planet around a white dwarf star

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Post by notFritzArgelander » Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:24 pm

helicon wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:00 pm
One wonders how the planets orbiting this star would have withstood the changes when it went through its red giant phase. Seemingly they would have been vaporized. Somehow one giant planet survived and it is even larger than its host star, and moved into an orbit that is so close that it is astounding. Fascinating stuff notFritz!
Of course the "now" planet could have been more massive, perhaps a brown dwarf or low mass star? The initial orbit was of course further out and friction from interacting with the red giant atmosphere led to orbital decay.
Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80, SV ED80 A f7; Newtonians: Z12 f5; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
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Re: exoplanetary first: giant planet around a white dwarf star

#4

Post by Michael131313 » Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:07 pm

Thanks n_FA. I also was wondering how the planet moved closer in.
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