Visual Solar June 10, 2024

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Bigzmey Online United States of America
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Visual Solar June 10, 2024

#1

Post by Bigzmey »

It has been a month since I had solar session. Mainly, because we kept having cloudy mornings. Today I decided to do one during lunch break and it worked out nicely. Here is my setup of single stack 50mm Lunt HA, and Stellarvue SV102ED with Meade Herschel wedge for white light. This is the same setup as last month. I have done with upgrades and mods, at least for now. :)
Solar 061024.jpg


I read that mornings and afternoons are better for solar. In my case so far, I got the best conditions observing around noon today. This is what I saw in white light, but with better details.

https://www.spaceweather.com/images2024 ... mi1898.gif

Previously, the highest power I was able to use with W/L was 60x. This time I have pushed productively to 120x with Vixen SLV 6mm. The gain in details was considerable, in particular in AR 3709. I spent a few minutes soaking in its intricate details.

In HA I was also able to push past my previous best of 41x to 58x, using again Vixen SLV 6mm. In addition to usual details resolved at 41x, the higher power resolved for me a new layer of numerous micro proms around the disk. Larger proms were all in southern hemisphere showing neat shapes and details. There were a couple almost detached from the disk. There were quite few filaments and arches within the disk. This time instead of observing the whole disk I was slowly walking around the rim scanning with the pressure handle for intricate details in each segment.

My wife stopped by as usual to enjoy HA and W/L views. Another great solar session!
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102ED; Celestron: 14" & 9.25" EdgeHD, 8" SCT, 150ST, Onyx 80ED; iOptron: Hankmeister 6" Mak; SW: 7" Mak; Meade: 80ST.
Mounts: Celestron: CGE Pro. SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; iOptron: AZMP; ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: APM: 100-90 APO; Canon: IS 15x50; Orion: Binoviewer, LG II 15x70, WV 10x50, Nikon: AE 16x50, 10x50, 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Delos, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: 2" prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S, 6-color set; Astronomik: UHC.
Solar: HA: Lunt 50mm single stack, W/L: Meade Herschel wedge.

Observing: DSOs: 3183 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 2238, S110: 77). Doubles: 2471, Comets: 37, Asteroids: 292
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Re: Visual Solar June 10, 2024

#2

Post by messier 111 »

Same thing here, the weather is really not in my favor.
The best view I had of the sun happened two weeks ago around noon too.
the best session of my life in ha.
I'm glad to see that you were finally able to see the fireball.
thx for this good read.
I LOVE REFRACTORS , :Astronomer1: :sprefac:

REFRACTORS , TS-Optics Doublet SD-APO 125 mm f/7.8 . Lunt 80mm MT Ha Doublet Refractor .
EYEPIECES, Delos , Delite and 26mm Nagler t5 , 2 zoom Svbony 7-21 , Orion Premium Linear BinoViewer .
FILTERS, Nebustar 2 tele vue . Apm solar wedge . contrast booster 2 inches .
MOUNTS , cg-4 motorized , eq6 pro belt drive .

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won't come in.”
― Isaac Asimov

Jean-Yves :flags-canada:
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Re: Visual Solar June 10, 2024

#3

Post by Bigzmey »

Thanks Jean-Yves! I hope the weather improves for you two. At noon we are looking through the thinnest atmospheric layer, that probably helps.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102ED; Celestron: 14" & 9.25" EdgeHD, 8" SCT, 150ST, Onyx 80ED; iOptron: Hankmeister 6" Mak; SW: 7" Mak; Meade: 80ST.
Mounts: Celestron: CGE Pro. SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; iOptron: AZMP; ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: APM: 100-90 APO; Canon: IS 15x50; Orion: Binoviewer, LG II 15x70, WV 10x50, Nikon: AE 16x50, 10x50, 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Delos, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: 2" prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S, 6-color set; Astronomik: UHC.
Solar: HA: Lunt 50mm single stack, W/L: Meade Herschel wedge.

Observing: DSOs: 3183 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 2238, S110: 77). Doubles: 2471, Comets: 37, Asteroids: 292
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Re: Visual Solar June 10, 2024

#4

Post by StarHugger »

Nice report and setup Andrey !

Cool you were deep in to the micro proms with good seeing in HA, generally I am assuming here your micro proms are actually spicules and are much smaller, more dynamic, and possibly hotter. They are also much more abundant. While the term spicules is strictly defined for objects off the solar limb, their disk counterparts (let's call them fibrils for simplicity) cover the whole Sun, all the time.

Just thought to share a little, really like reading your visual Solar reports and your nite astro ones too...
Aaron / thestarhugger@gmail.com / Solar Kitchen Observatory / USA...

" Experimental " Solar Imaging, Custom Solar Filtering, Solar Electronic Assisted Astronomy & Visual Observation.
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Re: Visual Solar June 10, 2024

#5

Post by Bigzmey »

StarHugger wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 3:04 am Nice report and setup Andrey !

Cool you were deep in to the micro proms with good seeing in HA, generally I am assuming here your micro proms are actually spicules and are much smaller, more dynamic, and possibly hotter. They are also much more abundant. While the term spicules is strictly defined for objects off the solar limb, their disk counterparts (let's call them fibrils for simplicity) cover the whole Sun, all the time.

Just thought to share a little, really like reading your visual Solar reports and your nite astro ones too...
Thanks Aaron! Good to know. What is the term for the proms which has broken from the disk?
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102ED; Celestron: 14" & 9.25" EdgeHD, 8" SCT, 150ST, Onyx 80ED; iOptron: Hankmeister 6" Mak; SW: 7" Mak; Meade: 80ST.
Mounts: Celestron: CGE Pro. SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; iOptron: AZMP; ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: APM: 100-90 APO; Canon: IS 15x50; Orion: Binoviewer, LG II 15x70, WV 10x50, Nikon: AE 16x50, 10x50, 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Delos, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: 2" prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S, 6-color set; Astronomik: UHC.
Solar: HA: Lunt 50mm single stack, W/L: Meade Herschel wedge.

Observing: DSOs: 3183 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 2238, S110: 77). Doubles: 2471, Comets: 37, Asteroids: 292
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Re: Visual Solar June 10, 2024

#6

Post by StarHugger »

Bigzmey wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 3:39 pm
StarHugger wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 3:04 am Nice report and setup Andrey !

Cool you were deep in to the micro proms with good seeing in HA, generally I am assuming here your micro proms are actually spicules and are much smaller, more dynamic, and possibly hotter. They are also much more abundant. While the term spicules is strictly defined for objects off the solar limb, their disk counterparts (let's call them fibrils for simplicity) cover the whole Sun, all the time.

Just thought to share a little, really like reading your visual Solar reports and your nite astro ones too...
Thanks Aaron! Good to know. What is the term for the proms which has broken from the disk?
Floating and if witnessed breaking away Lift Off Prominence...

Those are exciting arent they indeed,

The Sun is also usually described in quadrants and hemispheres south and north, where the left side is the West limb and the right side the East limb. Southest Quad Northeast Limb and the like...

Best of Sessions and Skies Andrey, I look forward to hearing about your next observations !
Aaron / thestarhugger@gmail.com / Solar Kitchen Observatory / USA...

" Experimental " Solar Imaging, Custom Solar Filtering, Solar Electronic Assisted Astronomy & Visual Observation.
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