Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

Post any upcoming astronomical events, such as full moon, Lunar eclipse, Solar eclipse, etc etc.
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Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#1

Post by TSS TEAM »


MARSHALL'S NIGHT SKY THIS WEEK.

Let's get the second edition of Marshall's night sky this week rolling!
Welcome, and we hope you find something of interest.

Let's examine the highlights of the night sky this week, February 12-18, 2024.

We will list the highlights and discuss a few events. We hope you find this info useful and if you have anything you wish to discuss or add, please hit the "Reply" button below and let us know!
Please note that all images are from SkySafari, the link to the webpage is here: https://skysafariastronomy.com/
All other information is freely gathered from various websites, Apps, planetarium software and social media. We would encourage you to download and print your finder charts more specific to your location, the charts included are for basic guidance only and are printed as seen from a southern hemisphere perspective.
Many website like Sky maps.com will allow you to download and print out a free planisphere for each month, link: https://www.skymaps.com/


EVENTS for February 12-18

Feb 12) Lunar occultation of Neptune. This event will only be visible from most parts of Australia, be sure to check
and see if you fall in the correct zone! We will be expecting plenty of pictures from our Aussie contingent!
Feb 15) Close approach of Moon and Jupiter, look for this celestial dance early in the evening.
Feb 15) Conjunction of Mars and Pluto and there will also be a conjunction of the Moon and Jupiter.
Feb 16) Moon at first quarter.
Feb 16) Close approach of the Moon and M45.
FEB 18) Conjunction of Venus and Pluto.

COMETS for february 12-18

C/2021 S3 (PANSTARRS)
With a visual magnitude predicted at 8.2 this comet should be visible under good conditions with a telescope.
This comet can be found in the Southern Hemisphere and will be moving through the constellation Ophiuchus this week.
PANSTARRS.png




12P/Pons-Brooks
This 7th magnitude comet will be passing through the constellation Lacerta, it is only visible to the Northern Hemisphere.
Pons.png



144P/Kushida
This 9th magnitude comet will have passed through the Hyades last week, but still a good target, it should be seen in most telescopes and will present some amazing photo opportunities! Visible from both hemispheres.
Kushida.png



Comet 62P Tsuchinshan.
The below link shows a graphic of its path this month in Virgo, as it loops around just west of magnitude 4.9 Rho Virginis in the triangle formed by Virgo Galaxy Cluster members M87, M60 and M49. It outshines those galaxies, and we believe the comet and galaxy combination makes for an interesting contrast given they can appear similar to one another at times.

https://www.astronomy.com/wp-content/up ... .png?w=768

STARS

Feb 15) Algol at minimum brightness, magnitude 3.4 instead of its usual 2.1, for about two hours centred on 16:32 p.m. UT. Algol takes several hours to fade beforehand and to rebrighten after. More from Wikipedia below:
"Algol, designated Beta Persei, known colloquially as the Demon Star, is a bright multiple star in the constellation of Perseus and one of the first non-nova variable stars to be discovered. Algol is a three-star system, consisting of Beta Persei Aa1, Aa2, and Ab – in which the hot luminous primary β Persei Aa1 and the larger, but cooler and fainter, β Persei Aa2 regularly pass in front of each other, causing eclipses. Thus Algol's magnitude is usually near-constant at 2.1, but regularly dips to 3.4 every 2.86 days during the roughly 10-hour-long partial eclipses. The secondary eclipse when the brighter primary star occults the fainter secondary is very shallow and can only be detected photoelectrically. Algol gives its name to its class of eclipsing variable, known as Algol variables."
LINK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algol


PLANETS

Jupiter
The King of planets will be visible all this week above your southern horizon from the Northern Hemisphere and more the Western horizon from the Southern Hemisphere.
Shortly before midnight it starts to dip below the horizon giving you plenty of time to observe it.
This is observable with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope.

Uranus
This planet will also sit above your southern horizon from sunset through to around 1am.
Uranus will also be 3° south of a nearly First Quarter Moon Feb. 15

SPACE LAUNCHES Feb 12-18.

Feb 14) Falcon 9 IM-1, LC-39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida. 12:57 a.m. EST (0557 UTC)
Feb 14) Falcon 9 USSF-124. SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. Four-hour launch period opens at 5:30 p.m. EST (2230 UTC)
Feb 14/15) Soyuz Progress M-26 / 87P. Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. 6:25 a.m. MSK on Feb. 15 (10:25 p.m. EST, 0325 UTC)

International Space Station

We highly recommend using "Spot the station" from NASA to find out when the International Space station will be passing over your location.
This is a fun object to see flying high above, don't forget to bring the family out for this and wave hello to the souls aboard the ISS.
LINK: https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/
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Re: Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#2

Post by Bigzmey »


Nice overview, thanks Clinton!
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102ED; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD, 8" SCT, 150ST, Onyx 80ED; iOptron: Hankmeister 6" Mak; SW: 7" Mak; Meade: 80ST.
Mounts: SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; iOptron: AZMP; ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: APM: 100-90 APO; Canon: IS 15x50; Orion: Binoviewer, LG II 15x70, WV 10x50, Nikon: AE 16x50, 10x50, 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68, 62; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: 2" prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S, 6-color set; Astronomik: UHC.

Observing: DSOs: 3106 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 2180, S110: 77). Doubles: 2382, Comets: 34, Asteroids: 255
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Re: Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#3

Post by kt4hx »


Very in depth Clinton, well done.
Alan

Scopes: Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob ||
ES AR127 f/6.5 || ES ED80 f/6 || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian
Mounts: ES Twilight-II and Twilight-I
EPs: AT 82° 28mm UWA || TV Ethos 100° 21mm and 13mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm ||
ES 82° 18mm || Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm and 5mm || barlows
Filters (2 inch): DGM NPB || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow || Baader HaB
Primary Field Atlases: Uranometria All-Sky Edition and Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas
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"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#4

Post by messier 111 »


thx .
I LOVE REFRACTORS , :Astronomer1: :sprefac:

REFRACTOR , TELE VUE 85MM f7 , TS-Optics Doublet SD-APO 125 mm f/7.8 . Lunt 80mm MT Ha Doublet Refractor Telescope on the way .

EYEPIECES, Delos , Delite and 26mm Nagler t5 , 2 zoom Svbony 7-21 , Orion Premium Linear BinoViewer .

FILTER , Nebustar 2 tele vue . Apm solar wedge . contrast booster 2 inches .

Mounts , berno mack 3 with telepod , cg-4 motorized , eq6 pro belt drive .

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won't come in.”
― Isaac Asimov

Jean-Yves :flags-canada:
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Re: Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#5

Post by TSS TEAM »


Something extra for today's event.

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Re: Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#6

Post by helicon »


Really good information thanks for distilling it down to the key points Clinton
-Michael
Refractors: ES AR152 f/6.5 Achromat on Twilight II, Celestron 102mm XLT f/9.8 on Celestron Heavy Duty Alt Az mount, KOWA 90mm spotting scope
Binoculars: Celestron SkyMaster 15x70, Bushnell 10x50
Eyepieces: Various, GSO Superview, 9mm Plossl, Celestron 25mm Plossl
Camera: ZWO ASI 120
Naked Eye: Two Eyeballs
Latitude: 48.7229° N
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Re: Marshall's night sky this week February 12-18 2024.

#7

Post by TSS TEAM »


Falcon 9 launch delayed.

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