Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

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Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#1

Post by kt4hx »


After my little binocular outing at our dark site house last week, I was itching to get back over while the moon was out of the way. Though I had a great time with my short session with the 10x50’s last week, I really wanted to hit the galaxy hunting trails again. I knew that I may not make it back over until after the Christmas season concluded, so I decided to make a two night trip right before our Thanksgiving.

After about a three hour drive I made it to the house just after 1700 hours. I texted Mary that I had arrived, and that I would call her after finishing my logistical work. With the valley already in shadow since the Sun was behind the western ridge of the Alleghany Mountains (at least what passes for mountains here in the east!), I set about unloading the truck, then moving some stuff from the garage out to the observing site. Astronomical darkness was not far off, but I knew I would get a later start due to the timing of my arrival. Heading back inside I called Mary and we talked for a bit, then I bid her a good night and fixed something to eat. I looked at my notes a bit while I ate, and decided that I would work in Cetus this evening.

I layered up as the temps were in the lower 30’s (F), then I moved the big scope out of the garage after 1830 hours. In the dark I sat my gear up using my red light. In a short time my eyes adjusted to my environment and I could more easily see what I was doing as I busied myself. I had already done a pre-collimation of the scope in the garage and did a touch up after having rolled it to the observing position. I aligned the finder scopes and laid out the eyepieces I planned to use. My Interstellarum atlas was laid to the side, with some other notes. I then cracked the Uranometria atlas to chart 140. Aiming the scope at the wide pair of stars, mag 3.7 Zeta Ceti (Baten Kaitos) and mag 4.7 Chi Ceti, I dipped south from the two bright stars for my first object. The evening’s festivities commenced a little after 1900 hours, and the following is where my journey led me under the dark chilly skies of a rural valley at around 2,800 feet elevation.


(Equipment used)

17.5 inch f/4.5 dobsonian
Ethos 13mm (152x, 0.7° TFOV, 2.9mm exit pupil)
XW 10mm (199x, 0.4° TFOV, 2.2mm exit pupil)
XW 7mm (283x, 0.2° TFOV, 1.6mm exit pupil)


NGC 699 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=14.1, size=1.6’x0.3’, SBr=13.0):
Picked up with 152x, this spiral presented itself as a very dim and small diffuse oval glow. Taking a look with 199x, I could now discern an intermittent stellar core within its galactic disk. (New)

NGC 682 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.4, size=1.4’x1.1’, SBr=13.6):
This small and slightly bright thick oval disk displayed a stellar core at 152x. The view was very nice at 152x and I didn’t even bother going to 199x. (New)

NGC 655 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.0, size=1.4’x0.9’, SBr=14.0):
Next up, this lenticular appeared small and dim at 152x. It was smooth and even across is disk. Then at 199x a stellar core was seen at the center of its envelope. (New)

NGC 599 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.4’x1.4’, SBr=13.5):
Easily picked up with 152x, this object was a small but slightly bright rounded glow with an intermittent stellar core noticed. Then at 199x the stellar core was held steady, with the galaxy’s disk being quite obvious in the field. (New)

NGC 589 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.1, size=1.1’x0.9’, SBr=13.8):
Picked up using 152x, this lenticular presented a small and little bit dim slightly oval disk. Viewing at 199x a very subtle stellar core was noticed. The galaxy itself, while not bright, was still not difficult. (New)

NGC 593 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.6, size=1.2’x0.2’, SBr=12.8):
This lenticular was scooped up using 152x, but it was very small and fairly dim to the eye. Its disk was a thin oval shape, and homogeneous in appearance. It remained dim and smooth at 199x. (New)

IC 125 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=14.6, size=0.5’x0.5’, SBr=13.0):
Found with 152x, this spiral was very dim and very small in visual angular extent. It was a smoothly illuminated and rounded disk. Using 199x it remained homogeneous and while still fairly faint, it was clearly seen with direct vision. (New)

IC 128 (Cetus, barred spiral galaxy, mag=14.6, size=0.9’x0.7’, SBr=13.8):
The smaller and dimmer of two separated by about 2.5’, this barred spiral was found using 152x. It presented a very dim and small oval disk, and at 199x it remained a weak visual target. (New)

IC 129 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.1, size=1.4’x0.9’, SBr=14.1):
Just southeast of IC 128, this lenticular was clearly the dominant one visually. Dim and small, this oval was smooth and even across its dimension. At 199x, while more apparent, it remained dim and of small visual size. It disk also remained homogeneous to the eye. (New)


As an aside to the IC 128/129 pair, I noticed a dim double star about 14’ northwest of IC 128. It was a white pair of stars that were easily split at 152x, with the southeastern one clearly the brighter of the two. Checking Sky Tools 4 afterwards, I found it was the mag 9.1 and 9.5 pair GAL 309 (W.R. Gale). The 0.4 magnitude difference was very obvious. They are separated by 11.7’ (1905) with a position angle of 353°. Though I am not a double star chaser by any means, this duo caught my eye!


NGC 647 (Cetus, barred lenticular galaxy, mag=13.4, size=1.5’x1.1’, SBr=13.7):
I located this galaxy using 152x, and it presented as a small but subtly bright oval that displayed an intermittent stellar core at its center. It was obvious within the field at 199x and its core was now more of a concentrated brightness within the overall halo. (New)

NGC 649 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=14.3, size=0.9’x0.3’, SBr=12.6):
I suspected this object as a very dim and very small diffuse glow southeast of NGC 647 within the same field of view at 152x. Confirmed at 199x, it remained a very dim little oval disk that was smoothly illuminated. (New)

NGC 640 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=14.4, size=0.7’x0.5’, SBr=13.0):
This dim little dust bunny was picked up using 152x as a very dim and small thick oval glow. There seemed to be a very intermittent stellar core embedded within. Then at 199x though more apparent, the galaxy remained a dim entity in the field. The stellar core was also more obvious. (New)

NGC 584 (Cetus, elliptical galaxy, mag=10.5, size=4.1’x2.0’, SBr=12.5):
In the general area I ran into a few galaxies that I’d already observed during an earlier incursion into Cetus, but I stopped by them for a quick look. This elliptical was bright to the eye and subtly large in extent. At 152x it was an obvious oval glow with a bright core that was nearly stellar. I did not view it at 199x.

NGC 586 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.2, size=1.7’x0.9’, SBr=13.4):
Only about 4’ southeast of the previous galaxy, I also noticed this spiral that I’d already observed before. With 152x it presented a small and dim, but easy, oval disk. The core was a broadly brighter lens within the overall envelope. No need for 199x here.

IC 127 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.7, size=1.6’x0.4’, SBr=13.0):
About 24’ WSE of NGC 584, I picked up this spiral using 152x. I found it very dim and very small with a 12th mag field star off its southeastern edge. The galaxy’s disk was homogeneous in appearance. Using 199x the object was more apparent next to the field star, and remained an evenly illuminated thin oval. (New)

NGC 596 (Cetus, elliptical galaxy, mag=10.9, size=3.2’x2.0’, SBr=12.7):
Another previously observed galaxy, I stopped by this elliptical, which is located about 20.5’ southeast of NGC 586. With 152x it presented a small and somewhat bright slightly thick oval halo. Within its disk was a noticeable broadly brighter core. Not observed with 199x.

NGC 600 (Cetus, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.4, size=2.8’x2.1’, SBr=14.1):
My next old acquaintance was this barred spiral. Observed only at 152x it presented a subtly large, thick oval that was of low surface brightness. Its disk was evenly illuminated, but had a ghostly appearance due to the lower surface brightness. Though dimmer to the eye it was not a difficult object.

NGC 615 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=11.6, size=2.7’x0.9’, SBr=12.3):

About half a degree east of the previous object, another previously observed galaxy was seen. With 152x it displayed a somewhat bright and thin oval disk. It showed an inner lens of brightness within the overall halo, with a stellar core pinned to the center of the central lens.

NGC 636 (Cetus, elliptical galaxy, mag=11.5, size=2.8’x2.0’, SBr=13.1):
My final re-visit object was this elliptical, located about 1° ESE of NGC 615. Easily picked up with 152x, it presented a somewhat bright thick oval disk that was subtly large in extent. I now moved on to some new objects to round out my evening.

NGC 481 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.3, size=1.3’x0.9’, SBr=13.2):
I found this lenticular to be small and subtly bright using 152x. Rounded in shape it sported a stellar core at its center. Then at 199x it was more obvious to the eye, its core was a small inner knot of brightness surrounding the star-like center. The outer portion of the envelope was very diffuse in appearance. (New)

NGC 480 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=15.2, size=0.5’x0.2’, SBr=12.4):
I tried to pin down this dim spiral nearly 8’ east of the mag 6.6 star HD 8070. I ran through my magnification steps (152x, 199x and 283x) multiple times, moving on to other targets then returning to check again. But this galaxy simply eluded my grasp on this evening. Perhaps another time I can give it another go (tomorrow?). (Fail)

NGC 567 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.2, size=1.0’x0.6’, SBr=13.4):
I located this small and dim rounded disk using 152x. It was initially homogeneous to the eye, but at 199x an intermittent stellar core made an appearance. Overall it was a diffuse little dust bunny. (New)

NGC 648 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.4, size=0.7’x0.4’, SBr=12.8):
This lenticular was picked up with 152x as a fairly small and dim homogeneous oval disk. Taking a peek at 199x, I was able to resolve a small non-stellar core within the galactic envelope. Otherwise it remained a small and dim glow. (New)

NGC 594 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.5, size=1.4’x0.6’, SBr=13.0):
Next up was this small and dim homogeneous oval that was easily located using 152x. With 199x it was more apparent and remained smoothly illuminated. Its oval disk seemed subtly elongated now as a little more of its halo in the major axis became visible. Though weak overall it was not especially difficult. (New)

IC 130 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.2, size=0.5’x0.5’, SBr=12.4):
I scooped up this little round glow using 152x. It presented as very small and fairly dim to my eye. Evenly illuminated across its disk initially, at 199x a stellar core became apparent. (New)

NGC 487 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.4, size=1.1’x0.7’, SBr=12.9):
Easily found using 152x, this spiral displayed a small and slightly dim homogeneous oval envelope. More apparent in the field at 199x, it remained smooth and even across its dimension. (New)

NGC 291 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.9, size=1.1’x0.6’x0.6’, SBr=13.2):
It was after 2130 hours now and to be honest I was getting cold! But I wanted to pin down a few more before I called it an evening. This spiral was found using 152x, and it appeared as a small and fairly dim diffuse oval. Checking it out with 199x, I now was picking up an intermittent stellar core. (New)

NGC 277 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.7, size=1.4’x1.2’, SBr=14.0):
This dim rounded glow was located immediately southeast of a mag 11.0 field star. Initially the galaxy was not apparent, but after studying the field for a bit I finally discerned it in the glare field of the nearby star. Small in angular extent it was diffuse in appearance. Going to 199x it was more apparent now, but remained small, dim and homogeneous. (New)

NGC 270 (Cetus, lenticular galaxy, mag=12.9, size=1.7’x1.2’, SBr=13.4):
Just 11.5’ WSW of the previous object I could easily see this galaxy in the field of view. Centering it at 152x, it presented a small and very diffuse oval disk with a very noticeable non-stellar core brightness that was slightly bright to my eye. Then at 199x, it was more apparent and quite obvious. The core now had an intermittent stellar appearance within the concentrated core region. (New)

NGC 298 (Cetus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.8, size=1.7’x0.6’, SBr=13.1):
I now wrapped up the session with a pair of galaxies. First was this spiral, that at 152x appeared small and dim, presenting a diffuse oval glow. Viewed with 199x, the core now exhibited an intermittent stellar character. Though dim, it was the brightest of the pair within the same field of view. (New)

NGC 293 (Cetus, barred spiral galaxy, mag=14.2, size=1.1’x0.9’, SBr=13.9):
My final object this evening is located about 13’ northwest of NGC 298. Seen with 152x, it was fairly dim. A thick oval in shape, it appeared smoothly illuminated to my eye. Using 199x it was more apparent, yet remained fairly dim and small, displaying a homogeneous galactic disk. (New)


It was now after 2200 hours and I admit that the cool air was working on my old body! My toes were a little achy, as were my hands (despite the gloves). I simply cannot endure the cold as I used to, but that is part of aging. Still, all in all, I put in a good three hours under the chilly dark sky, and galaxies were pursued and captured by my observing eye. So despite my minor discomfort, I was a contented old goat. :icon-smile: But it was now time to head inside, so I moved my gear back to the garage. Then I happily returned to the warmth of the house to shed my layers and have a bit to eat before retiring for the rest of the night. As I lay in bed, I could see the night sky through the window above my head. I fell asleep as it moved onward, unconcerned with my presence. Thanks for reading along, and I will see you out there again tomorrow evening!

(Link to 2nd evening's report - viewtopic.php?t=28253)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#2

Post by Lady Fraktor »


A great list Alan, you continue to amaze me with your viewing reports :)
See Far Sticks: Antares 105mm f/15 (modified), AOM 105mm f/9.5, Celestron 150mm f/8 (modified), Stellarvue NHNG DX 80mm f/6.9, TAL 100RS f/10, Vixen SD115s f/7.7
HD Pointy Things: EQ-5, TAL MT-1, Vixen SXP, Vixen AXJ
LD Pointy Things: Celestron SLT, Manfrotto 055B/ RC128, Manfrotto 028B/ Stellarvue M2C/ Argo Navis
Light Benders: 2” Astro-Physics MaxBright, 2” Stellarvue Deluxe, 2” TAL/ NPZ dielectric, 2” Baader Amici prism, 2” Long Perng Amici prism, 2” Baader Herschel wedge, Vixen 1.25" flip mirror
Jewellery: Antares to Zeiss, now only slightly more than 1 person requires!
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#3

Post by Bigzmey »


Impressive haul of galaxies Alan, as always! :) Last Friday I was also hunting in Cetus, but doubles (finishing up the report).

We have discussed that there are many similarities between our dark sites. Looks like our routines are also similar. Arrived at the site - text my wife, Alyona. Setup scopes and camp - call Alyona to chat. Later on text her good night, and finally falling to sleep while watching the night sky. :D
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102ED; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD, 8" SCT, 150ST, Onyx 80ED; iOptron: Hankmeister 6" Mak; SW: 7" Mak; Meade: 80ST.
Mounts: SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; iOptron: AZMP; ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: APM: 100-90 APO; Canon: IS 15x50; Orion: Binoviewer, LG II 15x70, WV 10x50, Nikon: AE 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68, 62; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV; Meade: UWA, SWA.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: 2" prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S, 6-color set; Astronomik: UHC.

Observing: DSOs: 2853 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 2107, S110: 77). Doubles: 2087, Comets: 29, Asteroids: 168
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#4

Post by Makuser »


Hi Alan. I can always expect a great observing report from you and indeed here it is again. I am glad that you were able to get to your dark site house and put that 17.5" Dob telescope to work. This is a huge haul of IC and NGC objects that you logged on this outing. Thanks for yet another well written and descriptive report Alan and I hope that you and Mary have a very enjoyable Thanksgiving tomorrow.
Marshall
Sky-Watcher 90mm f/13.8 Maksutov-Cassegrain on motorized Multimount
Orion Astroview 120ST f/5 Refractor on EQ3 mount
Celestron Comet Catcher 140mm f/3.64 Schmidt-Newtonian on alt-az mount
Celestron Omni XLT150R f/5 Refractor on CG4 mount with dual axis drives.
Orion 180mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain on CG5-GT Goto mount.
Orion XT12i 12" f/4.9 Dobsonian Intelliscope.
Kamakura 7x35 Binoculars and Celestron SkyMaster 15x70 Binoculars. ZWO ASI 120MC camera.
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#5

Post by kt4hx »


Lady Fraktor wrote: Wed Nov 23, 2022 7:41 pm A great list Alan, you continue to amaze me with your viewing reports :)

Thank you Gabrielle, you're kind comments are very much appreciated.

Bigzmey wrote: Wed Nov 23, 2022 8:37 pm Impressive haul of galaxies Alan, as always! :) Last Friday I was also hunting in Cetus, but doubles (finishing up the report).

We have discussed that there are many similarities between our dark sites. Looks like our routines are also similar. Arrived at the site - text my wife, Alyona. Setup scopes and camp - call Alyona to chat. Later on text her good night, and finally falling to sleep while watching the night sky. :D

Thank you Andrey and I look forward to your report. My second night report (also in Cetus) is in the works. As for our similarities, sounds like a good routine to me! :icon-smile:


The old saying "great minds think alike" might apply. Even if we don't have great minds, we do at least think alike! :lol:
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#6

Post by kt4hx »


Makuser wrote: Wed Nov 23, 2022 8:43 pm Hi Alan. I can always expect a great observing report from you and indeed here it is again. I am glad that you were able to get to your dark site house and put that 17.5" Dob telescope to work. This is a huge haul of IC and NGC objects that you logged on this outing. Thanks for yet another well written and descriptive report Alan and I hope that you and Mary have a very enjoyable Thanksgiving tomorrow.

Thank you very much Marshall. Mary and I truly hope you and Sherry have a very nice Thanksgiving. We are going to our daughter's house in a neighboring county.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#7

Post by kt4hx »


As a follow-up on the double star I mentioned northwest of the galaxy IC 128 and to give some context to the field, below is an annotated DSS image. Of course the galaxies appear brighter than I saw them, plus the double star was easily split through the eyepiece as to compared to the image.

GAL 309_Cetus.jpg
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#8

Post by Unitron48 »


Great report and session, Alan! I am always amazed by your detailed reporting, especially considering you have just captured 30+ objects!!

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Dave
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"Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." Albert Einstein
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

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Post by kt4hx »


Unitron48 wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 12:50 pm Great report and session, Alan! I am always amazed by your detailed reporting, especially considering you have just captured 30+ objects!!

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Dave

Thank you Dave, I appreciate your kind comments. I was just working on my report for the second night (another 30+ evening).

Happy Thanksgiving as well!


22852176_1868741906473895_2972255876810317038_n.png
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#10

Post by helicon »


Great report Alan! Nice to see you swimming in Cetus and pulling in galaxies left and right. Certainly VROD worthy so congrats on winning the award for today!
-Michael
Dobsonian: 10" Zhumell f/4.9
Refractors: ES AR152 f/6.5 Achromat on Twilight II, Celestron 102mm XLT f/9.8, KOWA 90mm spotting scope
Grab-n-go: AWB 5.1" Onesky Newtonian
Binoculars: Oberwerk 25x100, Celestron SkyMaster 15x70, Bushnell 10x50
Eyepieces: Explore Scientific line, GSO Superview, 9mm Plossl, Edmund 28mm RKE, Celestron 25mm Plossl
Camera: ZWO ASI 120
Naked Eye: Two Eyeballs
Latitude: 48.7229° N
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#11

Post by kt4hx »


helicon wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 2:59 pm Great report Alan! Nice to see you swimming in Cetus and pulling in galaxies left and right. Certainly VROD worthy so congrats on winning the award for today!

Thank you very much Michael. It had been a while since I'd been galaxy hunting in Cetus, and this first night went so well I decided to do the second evening there also. If I recall correctory, this was the first time I've done two whole observing sessions using the same specific chart in an atlas.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#12

Post by helicon »


Thanks Alan. Also it's great to see a plethora of reports being filed this Autumn season both from the membership and the mod team...
-Michael
Dobsonian: 10" Zhumell f/4.9
Refractors: ES AR152 f/6.5 Achromat on Twilight II, Celestron 102mm XLT f/9.8, KOWA 90mm spotting scope
Grab-n-go: AWB 5.1" Onesky Newtonian
Binoculars: Oberwerk 25x100, Celestron SkyMaster 15x70, Bushnell 10x50
Eyepieces: Explore Scientific line, GSO Superview, 9mm Plossl, Edmund 28mm RKE, Celestron 25mm Plossl
Camera: ZWO ASI 120
Naked Eye: Two Eyeballs
Latitude: 48.7229° N
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#13

Post by jrkirkham »


Thanks for posting another excellent report.
Rob
Telescopes: 50mm refractor, ED80 triplet, 90mm makcass, 10" dob, 8"SCT, 11"SCT
Mounts: Celestron CGX, Orion Sirius + several camera tripods
Cameras: Canon 6D, Canon 80D, ZWO-ASI120MC
Binoculars: 10x50, 12x60, 15x70, 25-125x80
Observatory: SkyShed POD XL3 + 8x12 warm room
Current Project: AL Solar System club / Double Stars
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#14

Post by kt4hx »


helicon wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 3:10 pm Thanks Alan. Also it's great to see a plethora of reports being filed this Autumn season both from the membership and the mod team...

Couldn't agree more Michael! I am heartened to see the increase in visual reporting. It confirms that direct observation is still alive in our hobby in this age of high-tech and high light pollution. The simple methods can still be fun and rewarding for those that make an effort to learn and improve their observing skills.

In reality, I see myself first and foremost as a member of this community rather than a mod. That is only a title that comes with a few perks. My first priority is and always will be to observe and share those experiences with everyone here. To motivate, teach and encourage is what keeps us all moving forward. :icon-smile:
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#15

Post by kt4hx »


jrkirkham wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 3:38 pm Thanks for posting another excellent report.

Thank you Rob. I appreciate you coming along on my journey through a piece of Cetus, and wish you good luck in your own endeavors under the sky.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#16

Post by Unitron48 »


Unitron48 wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 12:50 pm Great report and session, Alan! I am always amazed by your detailed reporting, especially considering you have just captured 30+ objects!

Dave
Congrats on your VROD recognition!

Dave
Unitron (60mm, 102mm, 127mm), Brandon 94
Stellarvue SVX127D
http://www.unitronhistory.com

"Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." Albert Einstein
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#17

Post by kt4hx »


Unitron48 wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 4:18 pm
Unitron48 wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 12:50 pm Great report and session, Alan! I am always amazed by your detailed reporting, especially considering you have just captured 30+ objects!

Dave
Congrats on your VROD recognition!

Dave

Thank you Dave. It was a fun two-night trip.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#18

Post by John Baars »


A great swim, very impressive report and congratulations on your well deserved VROD!
Telescopes in frequency of use : *SW Evostar 120ED F/7.5, * Vixen 102ED F/9, *grabngo: SW 102 Mak F/13, *OMC140 Mak F/14.3, on Vixen GPDX.
Most used Eyepieces: *Panoptic 24, *Morpheus 14, *Leica ASPH zoom, *Zeiss barlow, *Pentax XO5.
Commonly used bino's: *Jena 10X50 , * Canon 10X30 IS, *Swarovski Habicht 7X42, * Celestron 15X70, *Kasai 2.3X40
Rijswijk Public Observatory: * Astro-Physics Starfire 130 f/8, * 6 inch Newton, * C8, * Meade 14 inch SCT on EQ8, *Lunt.
Amateur astronomer since 1970.
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#19

Post by kt4hx »


John Baars wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 6:22 pm A great swim, very impressive report and congratulations on your well deserved VROD!

Thank you John.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
Primary Field Atlases: Interstellarum and Uranometria All-Sky Edition
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"Seeing is in some respect an art, which must be learnt." (William Herschel)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"No good deed goes unpunished." (various)
"I have become comfortably numb." (Roger Waters)
Some people without brains do an awful lot of talking, don't you think?” (Scarecrow, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
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Re: Observing Report for 21 November 2022 - swimminng with Cetus

#20

Post by Razz »


Great report! I always enjoy the amount of details you and others put into your reports. Thanks for sharing and congrats on the well deserved VROD!
Telescopes: SvBony SV503 80mm, Apertura AD10, Daystar SS60DS,Bresser AR-127
Mount: Skywatcher AZ-GTe
EPs: Baader Q turret with 32mm Classic Plossl and 18mm, 10mm, 6mm Classic Orthos and Q Turret barlow 2.25x
Baader Hyperion Mark IV 8-24mm zoom, Hyperion zoom barlow 2.25x
Filters: Celestron Variable Polarizing, SvBony F9131A UHC, Baader O III 10nm, Classic Lumicon O III, homemade solar filter with Baader OD 5.0 film, Optolong UV/IR cut
Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T3i
Binoculars: Celestron Upclose G2 10x50

Bill
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