Rima Sirsalis

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Rima Sirsalis

#1

Post by astroavani »

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Sirsalis rhyme
Judging by what has been read on the internet recently, there is a lot of confusion and a lot of disagreement about the channels, or lunar grooves. Different websites say that Rima Sirsalis or Sirsalis Rille, shown in the attached image, is a lava tube or lava channel, but some admit some confusion as this volcanic feature formed in the highlands of the Moon rather than in the seas. The word rille (channel or groove) is used to describe a wide variety of valleys that are considerably longer than they are wide. Winding channels, like the Marius, are volcanic lava tubes. Linear ones such as Ariadaeus and concentric ones such as Hippalus are tectonic cracks normally associated with the stress regime related to the impact basins.
Linear channels are interpreted as depressions formed over vertical bundles of magma called dykes. Dikes are born in regions where the horizontal stress is extensional, making it easy for the dike to push up the surrounding rocks. Sirsalis Rille, is one of the largest channels, or linear grooves on the Moon, approximately 380 km long. According to bibliographic references, the channel has a maximum width of 3.7 km and an average depth of 230 meters. What supports the interpretation of this channel as a volcanic dyke, are the magnetic measurements made by the Apollo and Lunar Prospector spacecraft, which revealed a large linear anomaly over the dyke. Sirsalis Rille is among the 8 or 10 channels approximately radial to the hypothetical Gargantua impact basin which had its western third filled by Oceanus Procellarum. Somehow the dikes are related to the vast Gargantua depression, but exactly how this relationship occurs is still a mystery.
The Sirsalis Channel is fascinating because in addition to being large in length it has a strong gravitational field, but the channel seen in the image can also be considered striking as it falls into the De Vico A crater and then scales its wall continuing on the other side. Looking at it like this, it seems that he appeared in this region like lightning. But it actually emerged, thanks to forces coming from below, apparently a vertical sheet of magma that also likely traveled laterally and fed lava into Oceanus Procellarum. As the channel cannot float, it is lower inside the crater than in its rim. To the east the channel crosses the interior of a large unnamed crater where it undergoes a major detour. The reason for this deviation is completely mysterious, but one thing that is clear is a series of canals that appear to start at Sirsalis and head towards Darwin, where a large canal crosses the interior diagonally. Channels sometimes seem to have a life of their own doing what they want to do. At least that's how they appear to be when we fail to understand the forces that created them.
In April 2013, photographing the same location (https://www.astrobin.com/47300/?q=sirsa ... astroavani), my colleague Zeca saw the photo and made an interesting observation: It looks like the shadow of Sirsalis J is apparently abnormal!
He also launched some very interesting speculations and my curiosity was piqued.
I analyzed QuickMap and created a three-dimensional image of this crater. I searched the internet but didn't find specific information about it. I find it interesting to repeat your statements here:
"There is something unusual about Sirsalis J, this crater just below Sirsalis F. See that the direction of the shadow inside the crater is at a different angle to the other surrounding craters. Also, it appears to be on top of a hill and that might explain your wrong shadow".
Sirsalis J is an impact crater near the top of a mountain, it could have some inclination different from other craters that occur in plains, this would explain its shadow with different orientation. It could still be speculated that this mountain could be a volcano because of its apparent cone shape and for being in Rimae Sarsilis.
These are speculations, but they can generate interesting research.
I believe that the impact of an object this size on top of a hill would probably destroy the entire hill, but these are pure assumptions without any basis.
In fact, looking at the 3D QuickMap image, one has the strong impression that there is a super dome, something I don't know exists on the moon with such proportions. Anyway, as Zeca said, they are pure speculations, but they make the art of lunar photography such a delightful hobby.
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by messier 111 »

very nice work , thx .
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

#3

Post by Johnny Carter »

Wonderful detail on this, well done.
I’ve learned a lot since I knew it all.
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by Makuser »

Hi Avani. A superb gallery of lunar images from you and also an excellent commentary too. Here is what our lunar professor and guru Charles Wood notes in one of his books concerning Sirsalis Rille: "A fine example of these long, nearly straight rilles travels north-northeast past the conspicuous Crater Sirsalis before disappearing along the Procellarium shore. This is not a sinuous rille like those around the northern side of the Aristarchus plateau but rather a flat-floored linear trough. This rille appears to be roughly radial to the Imbrium basin, but it's shape was controlled by something else. Matt Golombek measured the angles of the rille's walls and deduced that it formed in material that progressively thickened from 2 to 3.5 km deep in the direction of Orientale. Golombek concluded that the rille's width and the slopes of it's walls were determined by the thickness or Orientale ejecta through which the rille cuts and which increase toward the basin. Further evidence about the nature of this rille was provided by the Lunar Prospector spacecraft, which mapped a strong magnetic anomaly associated with it. The magnetism indicates the existence of a volcanic dike that failed to reach the surface."
Thanks Avani for a great lunar thread with your fantastic captures and information. So keep up this great work Avani.
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by Lady Fraktor »

Exceptional images Avani, I am looking forward to purchasing your lunar atlas one day :)
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by Gordon »

Congratulations Avani on having your image selected as todays TSS APOD!

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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by OzEclipse »

Superb images Avani.
Congratulations on the APOD.
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by BABOafrica »

Congratulations on the TSS APOD award.

I really enjoyed reading the explanation of the geological features associated with the image. Especially this line:

>>To the east the channel crosses the interior of a large unnamed crater where it undergoes a major detour. The reason for this deviation is completely mysterious,...<<

I suppose, at the very least, we can assume that the large unnamed crater was created before the rille was formed, right?

That does not seem to match well with this idea:

>>But it [the rille] actually emerged, thanks to forces coming from below, apparently a vertical sheet of magma that also likely traveled laterally and fed lava into Oceanus Procellarum.<<

I say that because I would think the lava, travelling laterally, would fill the unnamed crater at least to some extent long before reaching the Oceanus P. If the force pushing up from below can reach the rim of the crater, how much more likely it would fill the bottom of the crater.

Not that I know a lot about Lunar geological features. I'm just surmising what makes sense based on the information you provided in the very detailed description that you gave.

I would like to hear what you think about it. Thanks.

BTW, I also liked your description of Sirsalis J.

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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by astroavani »

Makuser wrote: Wed Jun 22, 2022 2:47 pm Hi Avani. A superb gallery of lunar images from you and also an excellent commentary too. Here is what our lunar professor and guru Charles Wood notes in one of his books concerning Sirsalis Rille: "A fine example of these long, nearly straight rilles travels north-northeast past the conspicuous Crater Sirsalis before disappearing along the Procellarium shore. This is not a sinuous rille like those around the northern side of the Aristarchus plateau but rather a flat-floored linear trough. This rille appears to be roughly radial to the Imbrium basin, but it's shape was controlled by something else. Matt Golombek measured the angles of the rille's walls and deduced that it formed in material that progressively thickened from 2 to 3.5 km deep in the direction of Orientale. Golombek concluded that the rille's width and the slopes of it's walls were determined by the thickness or Orientale ejecta through which the rille cuts and which increase toward the basin. Further evidence about the nature of this rille was provided by the Lunar Prospector spacecraft, which mapped a strong magnetic anomaly associated with it. The magnetism indicates the existence of a volcanic dike that failed to reach the surface."
Thanks Avani for a great lunar thread with your fantastic captures and information. So keep up this great work Avani.
Thank you for the complementary text Makuser friend!
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

#10

Post by astroavani »

Lady Fraktor wrote: Wed Jun 22, 2022 5:07 pm Exceptional images Avani, I am looking forward to purchasing your lunar atlas one day :)
We have a book here in Brazil about Astrophotography in which I am one of the co-authors:
https://www.amazon.com.br/Astrofotograf ... 4495&psc=1
Of course, my chapter couldn't help but be the Moon, too bad the text is in Portuguese.
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

#11

Post by astroavani »

BABOafrica wrote: Thu Jun 23, 2022 5:22 am Congratulations on the TSS APOD award.

I really enjoyed reading the explanation of the geological features associated with the image. Especially this line:

>>To the east the channel crosses the interior of a large unnamed crater where it undergoes a major detour. The reason for this deviation is completely mysterious,...<<

I suppose, at the very least, we can assume that the large unnamed crater was created before the rille was formed, right?

That does not seem to match well with this idea:

>>But it [the rille] actually emerged, thanks to forces coming from below, apparently a vertical sheet of magma that also likely traveled laterally and fed lava into Oceanus Procellarum.<<

I say that because I would think the lava, travelling laterally, would fill the unnamed crater at least to some extent long before reaching the Oceanus P. If the force pushing up from below can reach the rim of the crater, how much more likely it would fill the bottom of the crater.

Not that I know a lot about Lunar geological features. I'm just surmising what makes sense based on the information you provided in the very detailed description that you gave.

I would like to hear what you think about it. Thanks.

BTW, I also liked your description of Sirsalis J.

BABO
Hello BABO!
I believe you are right in your assumptions, but as mentioned in the text, these channels may have two origins, one is from lava tubes and spills and the other from faults in the crust, as my colleague Makuser put it from text from friend Chuck. I personally believe it to be a fault in the crust and not a lava channel as your own assumption reinforces this theory, if it were a lava channel it would certainly have filled De Vico and the unnamed crater which certainly predates its formation. Sirsalis F and J craters are certainly later because there is no sign of the channel inside, as they must have formed after the impact of the bolide completely erased the channel that should have been there.
I hope I have answered your question because I have great difficulty with English and I depend solely on the translator.
If you still have any doubts or I got it wrong, I'm waiting for your placement.
Best Regards
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

#12

Post by Lady Fraktor »

Your images and descriptions are usually better than my Rukl lunar atlas.
Just announce when they go for sale and I will buy one :)
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Re: Rima Sirsalis

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Post by BABOafrica »

astroavani wrote: Fri Jun 24, 2022 3:25 am
Hello BABO!
I believe you are right in your assumptions, but as mentioned in the text, these channels may have two origins, one is from lava tubes and spills and the other from faults in the crust, as my colleague Makuser put it from text from friend Chuck. I personally believe it to be a fault in the crust and not a lava channel as your own assumption reinforces this theory, if it were a lava channel it would certainly have filled De Vico and the unnamed crater which certainly predates its formation. Sirsalis F and J craters are certainly later because there is no sign of the channel inside, as they must have formed after the impact of the bolide completely erased the channel that should have been there.
I hope I have answered your question because I have great difficulty with English and I depend solely on the translator.
If you still have any doubts or I got it wrong, I'm waiting for your placement.
Best Regards
Many thanks for your response. What you say makes sense.

BABO
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