Betelgeuse brightness

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Betelgeuse brightness

#1

Post by SKEtrip » Sun Dec 08, 2019 4:57 pm

Interesting bit of information from the astronomical spectroscopy group.

http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/?read=13337
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#2

Post by Lady Fraktor » Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:02 pm

Thank you for posting this, if the clouds ever part I will have a look :)
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#3

Post by Graeme1858 » Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:39 pm

Fingers crossed!

Thanks for the link.

Regards

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#4

Post by Thefatkitty » Sun Dec 08, 2019 6:03 pm

Please go off, please go off.... Thanks for posting that :D That would be the event of a lifetime!

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#5

Post by notFritzArgelander » Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:07 pm

Hmmmmm.....

The long term light curve is here: https://www.aavso.org/sites/default/fil ... lgeuse.jpg

This is not as deep as the dip in the 1940s, 1950s.
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#6

Post by Shabadoo » Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:39 pm

Last night, prior to seeing this thread, I was viewing Betelgeuse through my binoculars, and thought, "gee it's looking kinda dim."
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#7

Post by OzEclipse » Mon Dec 09, 2019 11:28 am

It's looking very faint here but the bushfire smoke is so thick I can barely see down the street so don't put too much on that observation.
Anyone with a DSLR and a 50mm lens could take pictures straight off a tripod, keep the exposure constant and short enough that you don't blow the well. You could do your own light curve-just for fun.

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#8

Post by bladekeeper » Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:27 am

If the darn thing explodes, that will be classified as an astronomical event, and we all know how that turns out. We'll be clouded out until May at least...

Am I getting cynical?
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#9

Post by John Fitzgerald » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:07 am

I think this is simply a periodic dip, and probably nothing special. When it does go supernova, it will probably happen as the sun passes north of it .
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#10

Post by OzEclipse » Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:01 pm

bladekeeper wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:27 am
If the darn thing explodes, that will be classified as an astronomical event, and we all know how that turns out. We'll be clouded out until May at least...

Am I getting cynical?
Not at all. Perfectly clear here. Transparency is a bit poor. This is a pic of the near full moon shot at full moon normal exposure. Moon was high in the sky
bushfire-moon-orig.jpg
No not cynical
All safe here, just smoke from 50km away.

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#11

Post by SKEtrip » Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:47 pm

bladekeeper wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:27 am
If the darn thing explodes, that will be classified as an astronomical event, and we all know how that turns out. We'll be clouded out until May at least...

Am I getting cynical?
Nah, just a realist. I kinda figure it will be a spectacular show for a day or two, then we'll all be sick of it as it drowns out seeing anything else.
Or, most likely John will be right -
John Fitzgerald wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:07 am
I think this is simply a periodic dip, and probably nothing special. When it does go supernova, it will probably happen as the sun passes north of it .
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#12

Post by SKEtrip » Wed Dec 18, 2019 6:57 pm

For anyone who was worried:
http://www.astronomy.com/magazine/ask-a ... WtPFWcueNc

Has anyone had a chance to take a look?
Sorry, but I'm not setting up in 8" of - that stuff.
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#13

Post by dagadget » Wed Dec 18, 2019 7:20 pm

It has always seemed dimmer to me but then again the color of it's light has always been kind of reddish and that does not show as good as bright whitish Blue like Sirius. Still would seriously mess up Orion Constellation if it went away.
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#14

Post by Shabadoo » Sat Dec 21, 2019 3:31 pm

Clear skies last night. Eyeball view, looked to be even dimmer than I recall from 12/9.
Dimmer than Aldebaran and Procyon. Comparable to Pollux.
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#15

Post by helicon » Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:06 pm

I've noticed this recently when looking at Orion naked eye, seems greatly outshined by Rigel.
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#16

Post by smp » Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:08 pm

From EarthSky.org:
"Betelgeuse is ‘fainting’ but (probably) not about to explode"

https://earthsky.org/space/betelgeuse-f ... -395418329

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#17

Post by pakarinen » Mon Dec 23, 2019 6:15 pm

Well, if it does blow, it's going to ruin the looks of Orion.

Good bucket list item though...
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#18

Post by j.gardavsky » Mon Dec 23, 2019 8:31 pm

smp wrote:
Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:08 pm
From EarthSky.org:
"Betelgeuse is ‘fainting’ but (probably) not about to explode"

https://earthsky.org/space/betelgeuse-f ... -395418329

smp
... and in plain language, the Betelgeuse is just smoking
https://phys.org/news/2011-06-flames-betelgeuse.html

Best,
JG
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#19

Post by SKEtrip » Tue Dec 24, 2019 4:13 am

j.gardavsky wrote:
Mon Dec 23, 2019 8:31 pm
smp wrote:
Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:08 pm
From EarthSky.org:
"Betelgeuse is ‘fainting’ but (probably) not about to explode"

https://earthsky.org/space/betelgeuse-f ... -395418329

smp
... and in plain language, the Betelgeuse is just smoking
https://phys.org/news/2011-06-flames-betelgeuse.html

Best,
JG
Thanks, JG. I was digging for more info today. Working to understand exactly what is happening to Betelguese. I've ordered
Stevenson's Extreme Explosions: Supernovae, Hypernovae, Magnetars, and Other Unusual Cosmic Blasts.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/14614 ... UTF8&psc=1

I'm currently reading his work on Star Clusters -The Complex Lives of Star Clusters. He covers a lot of variable star processes.

I've only been able to observe Betelguese naked eye so far & it is very noticeable. Had high thin clouds a few nights ago it should have "burned" through to be visible
& was not there as Rigel was. Clear tonight & it looks muted in both brightness & color to me, need to put the binos on it.
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#20

Post by seigell » Wed Dec 25, 2019 12:42 am

j.gardavsky wrote:
Mon Dec 23, 2019 8:31 pm
smp wrote:
Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:08 pm
From EarthSky.org:
"Betelgeuse is ‘fainting’ but (probably) not about to explode"

https://earthsky.org/space/betelgeuse-f ... -395418329

smp
... and in plain language, the Betelgeuse is just smoking
https://phys.org/news/2011-06-flames-betelgeuse.html

Best,
JG
My goto for No-Nonsense Astronomy is Phil Plait's Bad Astronomy - "Don't Panic - Betelgeuse is (almost certainly) not about to Explode"
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