anti Dark Matter?

Discuss Astrophysics.
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

anti Dark Matter?

#1

Post by chasmanian »

nFA,

I just googled a bit and figured I'd ask you now.

could there be anti Dark Matter?

regular matter and energy can be transformed into each other.
and regular antimatter exists.
so, could we say that there is also
anti energy?
or is that not quite how it works?

could there be anti Dark Energy?

thank you for any thoughts, :)
Charlie

here are some links to stuff I found:

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586- ... %20objects.


https://home.cern/news/news/physics/pro ... antimatter

and just for fun, I wondered if there could be Dark Matter Stars, and found this.
if there are, I wonder what would happen if one went supernova.
here's an article. Forbes is giving me 4 free articles (don't know if that means per month or forever.) :)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jillianscu ... 7fd49821ea
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#2

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Sun Feb 28, 2021 12:56 am nFA,

I just googled a bit and figured I'd ask you now.

could there be anti Dark Matter?
I'd prefer the term dark antimatter. And yes, everything we know about quantum field theory says that all particles of matter have corresponding particles of antimatter. The antimatter particle that corresponds to a particle of matter has opposite charges (remember that there is more than just electric charge in the Standard Model, there are other charges corresponding to other fields. The mass remains the same though, which is important to remember because....
regular matter and energy can be transformed into each other.
and regular antimatter exists.
so, could we say that there is also
anti energy?
or is that not quite how it works?

could there be anti Dark Energy?
Energy density (apart from exceptions due to playing havoc with the vacuum with local small changes) is always positive. Remember above that for antimatter the mass stays the same but only charges (and parity and time reversal see the CPT Theorem for details) but the mass stays the same.

thank you for any thoughts, :)
Charlie
You're always welcome.
These links look interesting.
and just for fun, I wondered if there could be Dark Matter Stars, and found this.
if there are, I wonder what would happen if one went supernova.
here's an article. Forbes is giving me 4 free articles (don't know if that means per month or forever.) :)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jillianscu ... 7fd49821ea
But this one seems to me to be nonsense. For an assemblage of dark matter to produce light it would have to be charged and then it wouldn't be dark anymore. ;)
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#3

Post by chasmanian »

thank you very much nFA.
love your reply. just fantastic.

I have another question.
(mods, if its not ok for me to go off topic in my own thread, please tell me, and I'll start a new thread.)



space is expanding, but not where there are gravitationally bound objects (up to Galaxy clusters).
I searched the web, and found that
our Milky Way galaxy is part of the Local Group Galaxy Cluster.
so, about 10 million light years away, there is non gravitationally bound space, and it is expanding.

could there be black holes out there?

if yes, how would the expansion of space affect them?
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#4

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Mon Mar 01, 2021 4:36 am thank you very much nFA.
love your reply. just fantastic.

I have another question.
(mods, if its not ok for me to go off topic in my own thread, please tell me, and I'll start a new thread.)



space is expanding, but not where there are gravitationally bound objects (up to Galaxy clusters).
I searched the web, and found that
our Milky Way galaxy is part of the Local Group Galaxy Cluster.
so, about 10 million light years away, there is non gravitationally bound space, and it is expanding.
All space is expanding everywhere. The fact that the local cluster has enough mass to overcome the expansion is just that. It's not that there are regions where there is no expansion. In GR space expands through and throughout the Local Cluster. It's like an ant on a balloon that is being blown up. The background balloon expands even though the ant doesn't.
could there be black holes out there?

if yes, how would the expansion of space affect them?
There could be BHs out there indeed. They wouldn't notice the expansion of space locally.An ant on a balloon would have to do some footwork to maintain a comfortable placement of its extremities. :) The BH doesn't have to do that much.

Remember the Hubble constant is in the neighborhood of 70 km/sec per Megaparsec IIRC. A Megaparsec is about 3.26 million light years. So the local gravity of the BH overcomes the expansion with ease.
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#5

Post by chasmanian »

thank you extra super much nFA.

so space everywhere is expanding.
the space all around me is expanding all the time. wow!!

is the human body held together by gravity?
strong enough to overcome the expansion of space?

and you do RC about the Hubble Constant:
from wiki

"Hubble constant is most frequently quoted in (km/s)/Mpc, thus giving the speed in km/s of a galaxy 1 megaparsec (3.09×1019 km) away, and its value is about 70 (km/s)/Mpc."
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#6

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Tue Mar 02, 2021 4:52 am thank you extra super much nFA.

so space everywhere is expanding.
the space all around me is expanding all the time. wow!!

is the human body held together by gravity?
strong enough to overcome the expansion of space?
The human body is held together by electromagnetic forces (chemical bonds) which are much stronger than gravity so it's not a problem. If the ant on the inflating balloon is unfortunate it might trip while it regains its footing though.
and you do RC about the Hubble Constant:
from wiki

"Hubble constant is most frequently quoted in (km/s)/Mpc, thus giving the speed in km/s of a galaxy 1 megaparsec (3.09×1019 km) away, and its value is about 70 (km/s)/Mpc."
when i was in school the value was closer to 100 km/s/Mpc.
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#7

Post by chasmanian »

thank you nFA.

I get a kick out of contemplating:

I remember you saying (I might be paraphrasing), that the edge of our observable universe is (or is like) an event horizon.

now I am thinking about how the black holes in our observable universe are places where space is unobservable.
we can only guess whats going on behind the curtains.
just like beyond the event horizon at the edge of our observable universe.

next I wondered about how many black holes there are.
here's an article from Ethan, (it looks like this is my 3rd out of 4 articles forever, not per month, bah).

https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswith ... e6cb73614e

but read this from Nasa:

"Judging from the number of stars large enough to produce such black holes, however, scientists estimate that there are as many as ten million to a billion such black holes in the Milky Way alone."

https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/f ... lack-holes

so perhaps there are an extremely large number of black holes in our observable universe.
an extremely large number of unobservable places in our observable universe.
dang fascinating.
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#8

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:07 am thank you nFA.

I get a kick out of contemplating:

I remember you saying (I might be paraphrasing), that the edge of our observable universe is (or is like) an event horizon.
it's like one because it IS one. :) an event horizon is a boundary from which no signal is possible. that's all there is to it.
now I am thinking about how the black holes in our observable universe are places where space is unobservable.
we can only guess whats going on behind the curtains.
just like beyond the event horizon at the edge of our observable universe.
or we could refrain from guessing. :)
next I wondered about how many black holes there are.
here's an article from Ethan, (it looks like this is my 3rd out of 4 articles forever, not per month, bah).

https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswith ... e6cb73614e
i'm pretty sure it's per month......
but read this from Nasa:

"Judging from the number of stars large enough to produce such black holes, however, scientists estimate that there are as many as ten million to a billion such black holes in the Milky Way alone."

https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/f ... lack-holes

so perhaps there are an extremely large number of black holes in our observable universe.
an extremely large number of unobservable places in our observable universe.
dang fascinating.
the NASA article has a technically misleading statement.
Don't let the name fool you: a black hole is anything but empty space. Rather, it is a great amount of matter packed into a very small area - think of a star ten times more massive than the Sun squeezed into a sphere approximately the diameter of New York City.
You don't need matter to make a BH. A highly curved bit of space time with NO matter will do just fine. Since gravity = spacetime curvature is energy and has a mass equivalent you can make a BH out of nothing but curved spacetime. Also it's not an "area" it's a volume. Nit picking but so.....

Kind of a lot of no-see-ums, yes?
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#9

Post by chasmanian »

thank you very much nFA.
good about Forbes.

"You don't need matter to make a BH. A highly curved bit of space time with NO matter will do just fine. Since gravity = spacetime curvature is energy and has a mass equivalent you can make a BH out of nothing but curved spacetime."

how would this happen?
would these be primordial BH's?

"Kind of a lot of no-see-ums, yes?"

not sure what you mean. do you mean there are a lot of BH's?
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#10

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Thu Mar 04, 2021 4:48 am thank you very much nFA.
good about Forbes.

"You don't need matter to make a BH. A highly curved bit of space time with NO matter will do just fine. Since gravity = spacetime curvature is energy and has a mass equivalent you can make a BH out of nothing but curved spacetime."

how would this happen?
would these be primordial BH's?
we couldn't make one now in the present universe but primordially? why not? BTW all the analysis done on BH solutions in GR are done on "vacuum" BHs where there is no matter but only highly curved spacetime.
"Kind of a lot of no-see-ums, yes?"

not sure what you mean. do you mean there are a lot of BH's?
i mean two things. 1) there are a lot of BHs and 2) spring is coming and no-see-um season to afflict the backyard observer. :)
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#11

Post by chasmanian »

thank you very much nFA.

wishing for you that there are not many of the biting no-see-ums this season,
or that they fall into a black hole no-see-um.

I googled about this and that. and found these. hoping they entertain you.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravastar

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_sta ... l_gravity)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark-energy_star

this is an entry about George Chapline. it has an interesting story about him and Richard Feynman. including a picture of them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Chapline_Jr.
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#12

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Fri Mar 05, 2021 3:52 am thank you very much nFA.

wishing for you that there are not many of the biting no-see-ums this season,
or that they fall into a black hole no-see-um.

I googled about this and that. and found these. hoping they entertain you.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravastar

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_sta ... l_gravity)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark-energy_star

this is an entry about George Chapline. it has an interesting story about him and Richard Feynman. including a picture of them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Chapline_Jr.
Let me come back to this tomorrow? I'm not happy with these ideas but am late to dinner today....
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#13

Post by chasmanian »

ok, thank you nFA. :)
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#14

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Sat Mar 06, 2021 4:16 am ok, thank you nFA. :)
The short story is that all these things are unnecessarily exotic. Not feeling well today so I need to beg off again. I wound up looking at the DAMA problems.
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#15

Post by chasmanian »

thank you very much nFA.

I hope you are feeling better soon, nFA.
I just googled DAMA problems.
got Ethan, free article number 4 for me.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswith ... 1202e15364
User avatar
Graeme1858
Co-Administrator
Articles: 0
Posts: 3737
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2019 7:16 pm
1
Location: North Kent, UK

TSS Awards Badges

TSS Photo of the Day

I Broke The Forum.

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#16

Post by Graeme1858 »

notFritzArgelander wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:57 am You don't need matter to make a BH. A highly curved bit of space time with NO matter will do just fine. Since gravity = spacetime curvature is energy and has a mass equivalent you can make a BH out of nothing but curved spacetime.

Yeah but, don't mean to be contrarywise, don't you need matter (baryonic or otherwise) to curve spacetime with gravity? Possibly energy once the blackhole forms, who knows what's in a black hole! But matter required to create it in the first place?

Great thread Charlie!

Hope you feel better soon nF

Regards

Graeme
______________________________________________
Click Here for the AP Processing Challenge!
______________________________________________
Celestron 9.25 f10 SCT, CGX mount.
ZWO ASI294MC Pro, Canon 600D, Altair GPCAM2 290C.
Celestron 80mm Guidescope, QHY5-II Mono.
Miranda 10x50 Binoculars.
Image
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#17

Post by notFritzArgelander »

Graeme1858 wrote: Sat Mar 06, 2021 9:23 am
notFritzArgelander wrote: Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:57 am You don't need matter to make a BH. A highly curved bit of space time with NO matter will do just fine. Since gravity = spacetime curvature is energy and has a mass equivalent you can make a BH out of nothing but curved spacetime.

Yeah but, don't mean to be contrarywise, don't you need matter (baryonic or otherwise) to curve spacetime with gravity? Possibly energy once the blackhole forms, who knows what's in a black hole! But matter required to create it in the first place?

Great thread Charlie!

Hope you feel better soon nF

Regards

Graeme
Thanks, we’re experimenting with optimizing my therapy and it’s hit and miss.

Electromagnetic fields need charges for sources because the Maxwell Equations are linear. But you don’t need matter to make a BH! :) The equations of General Relativity are non linear so spacetime curvature can be its own source! The Schwarzschild metric is a solution with mass due entirely to spacetime curvature with nary a speck of matter anywhere!

Linear field theories need sources to make the fields. Nonlinear field theories can be their own sources. Newton's gravity was linear. Einstein's isn't.
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#18

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Fri Mar 05, 2021 3:52 am thank you very much nFA.

wishing for you that there are not many of the biting no-see-ums this season,
or that they fall into a black hole no-see-um.

I googled about this and that. and found these. hoping they entertain you.
They are entertaining. Reading the Wikipedia entries was amusing. For instance
The gravastar is an amusing chimera of an idea which cobbles together several ideas from previous work.

1) dark energy
2) matter shell solutions in GR

The Wiki correctly notes that gravastars have instability problems. This is a fatal flaw. One thing that is missing from the Wiki article is that the thin shell of "perfect fluid" with p = ρ (in units where c = 1 otherwise p = ρc^2) is a very strange kind of matter. :) It's matter where the speed of sound equal the speed of light! :lol: So the "matter shell" is made of unobtanium. The limit on the speed of sound is one third of the speed of light. A gas of massless particles can only reach a sound speed of one third the speed of light. So with this material right at the edge violating causality and having a sound speed that is higher than any possible matter, it's no wonder the object is unstable being composed of unobtainium.
The Black Star is a more legitimate idea. In Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble gravity is might even be required! In the past when I have spoken of BHs in ECSK gravity it is perhaps a little loose since the Black Star idea is exactly what an ECSK "black hole" looks like. The addition of torsion in spacetime coupled to particle spins produces a repulsive force that prevents collapse to a singularity. There are ongoing debates about the stability of such objects but it's hard......

The ECSK literature doesn't use the term "Black Star" though. For instance this work envisions massive neutron stars as the result.

https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.01131
In this project, we try to find the correlation between the non-local pressure inside the massive neutron stars resisting the gravitational collapse of the core and ECSK dark energy led by the effect of spin-torsion coupling between quark fields and the space-time at very high densities much larger than the nuclear density. The injection of dark energy into the core of massive neutron stars (MANs) and extra resistant nature of this dark energy to the collapse of MANs by the anti-gravity give the possibility of existence of neutron stars in the unobserved mass range of [2.16M⊙,5M⊙]. Obtaining the ECSK TOV equation gives the local pressure of the ambient medium of MANs. Moreover, the negative pressure from the ECSK dark energy is obtained from the Lagrangian again, from which we are able to investigate the hydro-static equilibrium of the core and ambient medium of the MANs. If the equilibrium state is satisfied for the unobserved mass gap for the MANs in ECSK theory framework this will imply our model predicts this vast mass range of unobserved spectrum of the MANs in astrophysical studies.
This idea is more plausible than Gravastars but less interesting than Black Stars, The missing element here is a way of converting infalling matter into Dark Energy. That is unknown physics not self contradictory physics.
this is an entry about George Chapline. it has an interesting story about him and Richard Feynman. including a picture of them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Chapline_Jr.
He's a clever fellow.
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
User avatar
chasmanian
Saturn Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat May 11, 2019 1:06 am
1
Location: USA

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#19

Post by chasmanian »

thank you very much Graeme.

thank you nFA for your very interesting thoughts about all of this.
utterly fascinating.

is it possible that all of the Black Holes in the Universe,
are actually Black Stars?
User avatar
notFritzArgelander
Universal Ambassador
Articles: 0
Posts: 9995
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 4:13 pm
1
Location: Idaho US

TSS Awards Badges

Re: anti Dark Matter?

#20

Post by notFritzArgelander »

chasmanian wrote: Sun Mar 07, 2021 4:33 am
is it possible that all of the Black Holes in the Universe,
are actually Black Stars?
let's step away from the specifics of theories that make Dark Stars to a more general consideration. the main question is whether whatever theory predicts that the surface of the Black Star is at or outside the event horizon?

if the theory gives results that indicate a Black Star surface is larger than the equivalent mass event horizon then the answer is definitely no. LIGO/Virgo see clean signals from BH mergers so for all those events were are sure Black Stars are not involved. They are BHs.

Now what if the theory predicts that the object collapses into an event horizon? Then all bets are off and all BHs could be Black Stars. LIGO\Virgo might not be able to tell....

The ECSK paper I linked above that had fat neutron stars is not the only way ECSK could yield a Black Star. It's possible that the torsion spin fluid could stop collapse only after densities get much closer to the Planck density, for instance.
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
Post Reply

Return to “Astrophysics”