Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

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notFritzArgelander
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Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by notFritzArgelander » Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:01 pm

Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80 (mods for white light solar), SV ED80 A f7; Newtonians: Z12 f5; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by GCoyote » Tue Sep 10, 2019 10:59 pm

A second line of research for these facilities should generate additional support and funding. Very nice.
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by Michael131313 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:15 pm

Thanks n_FA. Does DM have to be a particle?
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by notFritzArgelander » Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:21 pm

Michael131313 wrote:
Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:15 pm
Thanks n_FA. Does DM have to be a particle?
I don't think so. It could be something much more interesting like a point defect in spacetime.
Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80 (mods for white light solar), SV ED80 A f7; Newtonians: Z12 f5; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by chasmanian » Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:28 am

hey nFA, here's a Dr. H blog from a few years ago.

http://backreaction.blogspot.com/2013/1 ... fects.html

at the end of the blog, she says she's excited to be working on this, because nobody else has.
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by AntennaGuy » Mon Sep 16, 2019 2:43 am

chasmanian wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:28 am
hey nFA, here's a Dr. H blog from a few years ago.

http://backreaction.blogspot.com/2013/1 ... fects.html

at the end of the blog, she says she's excited to be working on this, because nobody else has.
Interesting. Thank you.
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by notFritzArgelander » Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:16 am

chasmanian wrote:
Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:28 am
hey nFA, here's a Dr. H blog from a few years ago.

http://backreaction.blogspot.com/2013/1 ... fects.html

at the end of the blog, she says she's excited to be working on this, because nobody else has.
I think that she may exaggerate a little when she says no one else is working on spacetime defects. There is quite a bit of literature on it from the string theory folks. Ethan Siegel gives a pretty cogent summary here:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswith ... b85dd0281e

It has even been speculated that Planck's constant (and so all quantum phenomena) arise from torsional defects in space time:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00671851

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 1652900407

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1701.01829.pdf

Now at the risk of being boring, Einstein Cartan Sciama Kibble gravity is a natural arena for torsional defects.
Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80 (mods for white light solar), SV ED80 A f7; Newtonians: Z12 f5; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
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Re: Gravitational wave detectors might detect dark matter particles

Post by chasmanian » Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:22 am

thank you very much nFA!!
and you are not boring.
you are fascinating beyond words!!
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