Messier 35

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mariosi
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Messier 35

#1

Post by mariosi » Thu Nov 07, 2019 4:47 pm

Messier 35
(also known as M35, or NGC 2168) is an open cluster in the constellation Gemini. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux in 1745 and independently discovered by John Bevis before 1750. The cluster is scattered over an area of the sky almost the size of the full moon and is located 850 parsecs (2,800 light-years) from Earth.

The mass of M35 has been computed using a statistical technique based on proper motion velocities of its stars.[3] The mass within the central 3.75 parsecs was found to be between 1600 and 3200 solar masses (95 percent confidence), consistent with the mass of a realistic stellar population within the same radius.

The compact open cluster NGC 2158 lies directly southwest of M35.(Wikipedia)

Constellation Gemini
Right ascension 06h 09.1m
Declination +24° 21′
Distance 2800 ly (850 pc)
Apparent magnitude (V)5.30
Apparent dimensions (V)28 arcmins

DAY:Saturday DATE:9/1/16 TIME:10:50
SCOPE:Dob 10px Sky-Watcher F.L.1200/f4.7
EYEPIECE:T/S plossl 30mm 2" F.O.V :68°
LOCATION:Mammari

Thanks for looking
Marios
Messier 35.jpg
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#2

Post by helicon » Thu Nov 07, 2019 5:14 pm

Nice sketch Marios, well done!
-Michael
Various scopes, 10" Zhumell Dob, ES AR152, AWB 5.1" Onesky newt, Oberwerk 25x100 binos, two eyeballs
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#3

Post by mariosi » Sat Nov 09, 2019 3:13 pm

Thank you Michael!

Marios
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