Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

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kt4hx
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Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#1

Post by kt4hx »

Since the moon has gotten out of the way and a single clear night presented itself, I headed over to the dark site to take advantage. Though the forecast was for clear skies and excellent transparency, seeing was projected to be horrendous. High elevation winds were wreaking havoc as were gusty winds closer to the ground. Upon stepping out, the sky, while beautiful, was a mass of scintillation.

Another issue was the cold. When I arrived at the house, there was still about four to five inches of snow on the ground and I had to shovel out my normal observing position so I didn’t have to slog around in the dark. About 1830 hours I set my gear up and aligned the finders, then returned to the house to get something quick and hot to eat. Before 1930 hours I finally stepped out. The temp was around 26° (F) with a “feels like” temp of 13° (F). Let the games begin!


(Equipment used)

17.5 inch f/4.5 dobsonian
ES 82 18mm (110x, 0.7° TFOV, 4.0mm exit pupil)
Ethos 13mm (152x, 0.7° TFOV, 2.9mm exit pupil)
XW 10mm (199x, 0.4° TFOV, 2.2mm exit pupil)


(Treasure found)

NGC 2392 (Gemini, planetary nebula, mag=9.2, size=0.8’x0.7’, SBr=8.2):
My first port of call would be Gemini for a couple of this month’s DSO challenges. Turning to chart 30-left in Interstellarum, I set off on the evening’s hunt. This planetary, popularly known as the Eskimo Nebula, was swept up at 110x as a very bright and somewhat large (for a PN) rounded orb of very pale blue light. Viewing at 152x and 199x, its disk was not smoothly illuminated, but contained a darker annulus surrounding the bright 9th mag central star. The brighter outer ring seemed diffuse and irregularly bright.

NGC 2420 (Gemini, open cluster, mag=8.3, size=6.0’, class=I2r):
Moving over to the next northern challenge object this month, I easily swept up this fine open cluster at 110x just over 2° ENE of NGC 2392. Compressed and detached from the general field, it was alive with over 30 stars with a backdrop of unresolved members. To my eye it reminded me of a mass of fireflies over a dark country field in the summer. I found it quite enchanting and pretty.

NGC 2492 (Gemini, lenticular galaxy, mag=12.7, size=1.0 x1.0’‘, SBr=12.6):
Being the galaxy hunter that I am, it was time to pursue those denizens of the deep. Next to the border with Cancer I located my first one. Swept up with 110x, it presented a slightly bright small round glow with a bright non-stellar center. Using 199x it was an obvious round diffuse glow. Interestingly the central brightness initially noticed seemed less pronounced. (New)

NGC 2481 (Gemini, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.4’x.05’, SBr=12.4):
Over 3° south of the previous galaxy, and about 16.5’ ENE of a wide pair of field stars (7th and 8th mag). It was picked up at 110x as a small and dim elongated homogenous stripe. Viewing with 199x it was an obvious object within the field, and now displayed an intermittent stellar core. I did not however pick up mag 13.8 NGC 2480 in the same field just to the northwest. (New)

IC 2199 (Gemini, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.2, size=1.1’x0.6’, SBr=12.5):
IC 2196 (Gemini, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.7, size=1.4’x1.1’, SBr=12.9):

I had previously observed this pair of galaxies a few years ago with the 10 inch from the dark site. However, there were two other dimmer galaxies nearby that I didn’t detect, so I returned to the field, about half a degree south of Castor. With 110x I first located the primary pair. IC 2196 was obviously brighter and larger than its field mate about 12.5’ to the southeast. IC 2199, though smaller and dimmer was still obvious at 110x. Both were homogenous ovals, and overall small in extent.

IC 2193 (Gemini, spiral galaxy, mag=13.4, size=1.0’x0.6’, SBr=12.6):
Studying the field northwest of IC 2196, I confirmed the presence of this small and dim oval at 199x. Its envelope was generally homogenous in appearance. (New)

IC 2194 (Gemini, spiral galaxy, mag=13.9, size=1.1’x0.3’, SBr=12.4):
Then moving just south of IC 2196, still using 199x, I studied the field intently at 199x. After a bit, my eye finally detected this very small and very dim diffuse oval. (New)

UGC 3829 (Gemini, spiral galaxy, mag=12.9, size=1.0’x0.8’, SBr=12.5):
Northwest of Castor I pulled down this spiral at 110x. It appeared as a dim and very small rounded puff with an intermittent stellar core. With 199x the galaxy was more obvious and the stellar core was seen steadily. (New)

NGC 2389 (Gemini, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.9, size=2.0’x1.4’, SBr=13.8):
Northeast of the previous object there is a small grouping of eight galaxies (NGC 2389 Group). Under the prevailing conditions I picked up the brightest three of this group. The brightest of the lot and its namesake was this barred spiral. At 110x it was a modestly large and slightly bright homogenous oval. Viewed with 152x and 199x, it remained homogenous but was obvious in the field. (New)

NGC 2379 (Gemini, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.5, size=0.9’x0.8’, SBr=12.9):
About 20’ WSW of NGC 2389 I spotted this dimmer and smaller round homogenous glow at 110x. At 152x and 199x it was more obvious but remained evenly illuminated across its disk. (New)

NGC 2375 (Gemini, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.6, size=1.3’x1.0’, SBr=13.6):
Just under 4’ WNW of NGC 2375 and in the same field of view, I picked up this small and dim out of round homogenous glow. At 152x and 199x it was easier, but remained the weakest of the three I picked up. (New)

NGC 2418 (Gemini, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.2, size=1.8’x1.8’, SBr=13.2):
Turning over to chart 48-left in the IDSA, I located the mag 5.0 star 74 Geminorum. About 42.5’ WNW of the star I swept up this small round glow with 110x. Fairly bright to the eye, it displayed a non-stellar central brightness. Also viewed with 152x and 199x it was quite obvious in the field with its concentrated core brightness embedded within a diffuse envelope. (New)

NGC 2411 (Gemini, elliptical galaxy, mag=13.8, size=0.9’x0.6’, SBr=12.7):
Next up was this elliptical about 37.5’ northwest of the previous object. Initially at 110x, I only suspected its presence in the field as a fleeting dim mote. It was confirmed using 152x as a very small and very dim homogenous oval. Looking with 199x while more obvious it remained weak. I suspected a very intermittent stellar core within the disk. (New)

NGC 2407 (Gemini, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.4, size=1.1’x1.0’, SBr=13.2):
Another 38’ west of the last object I nailed down my next. Interestingly, despite its brighter listed magnitude (grain of salt here), it was more difficult than NGC 2411. I hunted for it with 152x and only suspected its presence in the field a few minutes WSE of an 8th mag field star. However, I confirmed its presence at 199x as a small and dim round glow with an intermittent stellar core in its center. (New)

NGC 2406 (Gemini, elliptical galaxy, mag=14.2, size=0.7’x0.6’, SBr=13.0):
Just southwest of the previous galaxy, and in the same field of view, I also suspected this very small and dim dust bunny at 152x. It took 199x to confirm its presence and it remained weak, but an intermittent stellar core was picked up as seeing shifted. (New)

NGC 2359 (Canis Major, diffuse nebula, mag=8.0, size=10.0’x6.0’, SBr=13.3):
Taking a break from galaxy hunting before heading into Lynx, I swung down to one of this month’s challenge objects. The famous Thor’s Helmet (or Duck Nebula if you wish) was easily swept up in the 8x50 RACI finder as a tiny non-stellar dust mote. Moving to the eyepiece at 110x it was impressive without a filter. The main body of the nebular complex was bright and large, in its generally rounded shape. Its body was erratically illuminated giving the impression of movement within. Much dimmer, but also easily noticed were the “wings” emanating from the top of the helmet shape. These were very elongated and delicate wisps of nebulosity. Below the main section I also picked up the southern part (duck’s bill) streaming toward the west. This portion was dimmer than the helmet (or duck’s head) but more obvious than the streamers rising from the main section.

NGC 2419 (Lynx, globular cluster, mag=10.3, size=4.6’, class=2):
Now moving into Lynx, I quickly spotted the field for this distant globular in the RACI. The cluster is the eastern end of a line of three with a pair of 7th mag stars to its west. Taking a look with 110x and 152x, the cluster was a ghostly round glow that was granular in appearance. It was obvious in the field and presented an interesting view with the two field stars just to its west.

NGC 2532 (Lynx, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.4, size=1.9’x1.4’, SBr=13.2):
I now returned to the program already in progress – finding some new galaxies! Just into Lynx from the northeastern corner of Gemini I scooped up this somewhat bright oval using 110x. Slightly large, it displayed a broadly brighter core. Dropping in the XW10 (199x) the galaxy was bright and obvious within the field. (New)

NGC 2543 (Lynx, barred spiral galaxy, mag=11.9, size=2.3’x1.2’, SBr=12.7):
Turning to chart 24-left of the IDSA, I next targeted this barred spiral. Pretty bright and somewhat large oval at 110x, it displayed a broadly brighter central region. Viewing at 199x it was quite obvious in the field, plus something about its disk really piqued my curiosity. Studying it for a little bit I found its envelope to be unevenly illuminated. There seemed to be two dimmer sections on either side of the core and framed by brighter ones at the outer edges.

As is typical, when I note something of interest in a galaxy, I always make a note to check it later to see if there are any structural details that might account for what I saw. So after the session, I checked some images of the galaxy. What I found was this is a two armed barred spiral and images showed darker dusty areas on either side of the central bar, between it and the two spiral arms. That was a pleasing revelation indeed. (New)

IC 2227 (Lynx, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.1, size=0.7’x0.7’, SBr=13.1):
Just over 1° west of the previous object is a very wide east-west line of three stars. Between the eastern-most (8th mag) and center star (7th mag) of this line I searched for this dim fuzz-bot. Nothing was seen at 110x, but at 199x I confirmed its presence as a very small and dim round homogenous dust bunny. Overall it was weak, but readily seen. (New)

IC 2225 (Lynx, barred lenticular galaxy, mag=13.9, size=0.9’x0.7’, SBr=13.1):
Nearly 21’ SSW of the center star of the aforementioned line of three, I was able to pick up another very small and dim smudge of light with 199x. Though to my eye it was slightly dimmer than IC 2227, it was still clearly seen. (New)

NGC 2484 (Lynx, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=0.9’x0.8’, SBr=12.4):
Next up was this lenticular, which lies just over 1.5° northwest of the western-most star (6th mag HD 66175) in the previously mentioned line of three. This galaxy was located northeast of a pentagon pattern of 7th and 8th mag stars. First picked up with 110x, it presented a very dim and small round glow. Viewed with 152x and 199x it was obvious within the field, still small in extent and remained homogenous in appearance. (New)

NGC 2444 (Lynx, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.2, size=1.1’x0.8’, SBr=13.0):
NGC 2445 (Lynx, irregular ring galaxy, mag=13.3, size=1.4’x1.1’, SBr=13.6):

This interacting pair, though overall dim were easily spotted at 110x as a very elongated perturbed glow. The two galaxies were distinct, but in contact. The northern one (NGC 2444) displayed a stellar core, while the southern one, NGC 2445, was more diffuse. Another galaxy, MCG +7-16-15 (mag 14.9), just northwest of the pair was not seen. This duo are also catalogued as Arp 143 and VV 117. (New-2)

NGC 2691 (Lynx, spiral galaxy, mag=13.1, size=0.9’x0.6’, SBr=12.0):
Turning the page over to chart 23, I next targeted this spiral 2.5° SSW of magnitude 4.0 HD 76943. Found with 110x, it was a small and dim homogenous oval. Even at 152x and 199x it remained weak and diffuse looking. (New)

NGC 2759 (Lynx, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.0’x0.7’, SBr=12.4):
I star hopped over to mag 4.6 HD 77912 about 2.5° to the southeast in search of my final object for the evening. Almost 1° to the SSE of this star I located my quarry. Small and dim, this oval was evenly illuminated across its disk at 110x. Viewing with 152x it remained weak but was still readily seen in the field. Using 199x it became obvious, though still homogenous in appearance. (New)


I decided that I’d finally had enough of the cold and tough seeing, so I packed it in around 2230 hours. Back inside warming up, I checked the conditions, and found it was now 20° (F) with a feels like of 9° (F). When the surface winds were calm, it wasn’t too bad, but when they gusted – brrrrrrrrrrr! Anyway, thanks for coming out and braving the cold with me. I hope you get a chance soon to get out under a clear (warmer) night sky.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#2

Post by KingNothing13 »

Nice Alan - thanks for sharing.

It is just so snowy and cold here now that going out is one of the last things on my mind.

Just want to live under a nice warm blanket for the next couple of months.
-- Brett

Scopes:
Primary: Apertura AD10 with ES 82* 18mm (69x), 11mm (114x), & 6.7mm (187x); Nexus II with 8192/716000 Step Encoders
G-n-G: Orion GoScope II 70mm "Travel Scope" with Orion 25mm Kellner (16x), Orion 10mm Kellner (40x)
Celestron SkyMaster 15x70 Binoculars
List Counts: Messier: 65; Herschel 400: 26; Caldwell: 6
Carbon Star Hunt March 2021

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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#3

Post by Thefatkitty »

I'm getting cold just picturing this... I give you credit Alan, for taking out that monster in that cold!! You're a braver man than I :D

Despite your conditions, you sure bagged a lot, that's really something! And new targets to boot.

I always read your reports, and I was wondering... Do you have a count of just how many different galaxies you've seen with your 17.5"? I'd have to think it's in the mid-hundreds for sure. If I've asked this before I apologize in advance...

And too, I quite liked your title! :lol:

All the best and thanks for the read!
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#4

Post by kt4hx »

KingNothing13 wrote: Fri Feb 05, 2021 9:19 pm Nice Alan - thanks for sharing.

It is just so snowy and cold here now that going out is one of the last things on my mind.

Just want to live under a nice warm blanket for the next couple of months.
Thanks Brett. I understand the sentiment. I will be 67 this year and getting out like that is more of a challenge than it used to be, but my drive to get out under the dark country sky trumps that for the time being. I layer up and use toe warmers in my Sorel boots and stick it out as long as I can. I guess some would call me dedicated to my craft, while others might use the term crazy. :)
Thefatkitty wrote: Fri Feb 05, 2021 9:30 pm I'm getting cold just picturing this... I give you credit Alan, for taking out that monster in that cold!! You're a braver man than I :D

Despite your conditions, you sure bagged a lot, that's really something! And new targets to boot.

I always read your reports, and I was wondering... Do you have a count of just how many different galaxies you've seen with your 17.5"? I'd have to think it's in the mid-hundreds for sure. If I've asked this before I apologize in advance...

And too, I quite liked your title! :lol:

All the best and thanks for the read!
Thank you Mark. My goal every time I go out is to snag at least 20 new objects (mostly galaxies of course). I just made the personal benchmark this time. The most I've ever observed in one sitting is 95 I believe, but that was inside of a huge galaxy cluster where I didn't have to make a lot of large movements. It was mostly just galaxy hopping in that case, often times with multiples in the same FOV.

Well, as to your question, I don't really have a count of how many I've observed with that specific scope since I started keeping records a few years back. As you've likely seen me mention before I did not keep records for a long, long time. That was a huge mistake on my part and I deeply regret it. While I remember many objects from back then, a great number have succumbed to aging and fading memory. But now that I've started keeping records for the past several years, I can tell you that the total number of galaxies observed is well over 2,000. Up until I moved the large scope over to our second house in the dark skies of western Virginia, my observations were with the 10 and 12 inch for the most part. But since moving the big one over there, I would say it has collected well over half the total amount that are in my logs for the past several years. It simply goes deeper under any kind of conditions than my other dobs.

I thought the title might elicit a few smiles. :)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#5

Post by Thefatkitty »

OMG, 95 in one sitting and well over 2000 total? You've seen more galaxies in that one session than I have in my life.... I'm only at 52!

I do remember you mentioning not keeping records; don't feel bad. Been there, done that, but much like you not anymore.

You're a machine, Alan! Kinda like a ground-based Hubble.... :lol:

You have a good night my friend :D
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#6

Post by kt4hx »

Thefatkitty wrote: Fri Feb 05, 2021 10:13 pm OMG, 95 in one sitting and well over 2000 total? You've seen more galaxies in that one session than I have in my life.... I'm only at 52!

I do remember you mentioning not keeping records; don't feel bad. Been there, done that, but much like you not anymore.

You're a machine, Alan! Kinda like a ground-based Hubble.... :lol:

You have a good night my friend :D
Thanks buddy. I admit that I am serious about my galaxy hunting and finding as many of these distant objects as I can is my primary motivator. I don't apologize for that, as we each do what suits us best in this dynamic hobby. :)

Have a great evening and weekend, and hope you continue to get your strength back.
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#7

Post by Makuser »

Hi Alan. Wow, what a haul of nice DSOs in the cold. Another superlative and informative observing report from you again here. However, with the cold weather here, yes in normally sunny Florida lately, I am with Brett. We had freeze warnings in the northern part of our county (good luck citrus growers) and hoar frost on our grass yesterday morning. Stay in the kitchen or under the warm blankets for the next month of so. :lol: Thanks for your usual excellent report Alan, stay warm, and keep up the great work.
- Marshall
Sky-Watcher 90mm f/13.9 Maksutov-Cassegrain on motorized Multimount
Orion Astroview 120ST f/5 Refractor on EQ3 mount
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#8

Post by kt4hx »

Makuser wrote: Fri Feb 05, 2021 11:12 pm Hi Alan. Wow, what a haul of nice DSOs in the cold. Another superlative and informative observing report from you again here. However, with the cold weather here, yes in normally sunny Florida lately, I am with Brett. We had freeze warnings in the northern part of our county (good luck citrus growers) and hoar frost on our grass yesterday morning. Stay in the kitchen or under the warm blankets for the next month of so. :lol: Thanks for your usual excellent report Alan, stay warm, and keep up the great work.
Thanks Marshall. Seems this year the arctic is trying to dip down farther south. Coming on the new ice age? :lol:

I am not a fan of cold weather by any means. But at least at the dark site, I will not let it deter me from my pursuits. At home, where the LP is profoundly worse, then I am not as motivated to get out. But at the dark site house I hate to miss an opportunity.

I appreciate your kind comments my friend, and hope it warms up soon for you and Sheri. :)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#9

Post by messier 111 »

Thanks again .
I LOVE REFRACTORS . :observer: :sprefac: :Astronomer1: :galleleo: :telescopewink:

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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#10

Post by Bigzmey »

Excellent session Alan! Shoveling snow and braving cold to catch some galaxies, that's the spirit! Looking for more reports like that from you.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102 ED F7; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD F10, 8" SCT F10, 6" SCT F10, Omni XLT 150R Achro F5, Onyx 80ED F6.3; Meade: 80ST Achro F5.
Mounts: ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: Orion: Little Giant II 15x70, WorldView 10x50, Nikon: Action EX 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68s; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV; Russell Optics: SuperPlossls.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS silver mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: Positive lock prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S; Astronomik: UHC, Orion: UltraBlock, SkyGlow.
Observing: DSOs: 2106 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 1635, S110: 77). Doubles: 1441, Comets: 18, Asteroids: 95
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#11

Post by kt4hx »

Bigzmey wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 2:42 am Excellent session Alan! Shoveling snow and braving cold to catch some galaxies, that's the spirit! Looking for more reports like that from you.
Thanks Andrey. You may be thinking better him than me, as far as the shoveling snow and standing/sitting out in the cold though! :lol: As I said before, a few folks might consider me crazy! I just see it as being motivated, though perhaps to a fault. :)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#12

Post by Bigzmey »

kt4hx wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 3:27 am
Bigzmey wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 2:42 am Excellent session Alan! Shoveling snow and braving cold to catch some galaxies, that's the spirit! Looking for more reports like that from you.
Thanks Andrey. You may be thinking better him than me, as far as the shoveling snow and standing/sitting out in the cold though! :lol: As I said before, a few folks might consider me crazy! I just see it as being motivated, though perhaps to a fault. :)
Yep, better you than me. :) I close my desert camp when the temps get close to freezing at night. I would do a night or two at the backyard, but only if it is a warmer night :lol:

Still admire your drive.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102 ED F7; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD F10, 8" SCT F10, 6" SCT F10, Omni XLT 150R Achro F5, Onyx 80ED F6.3; Meade: 80ST Achro F5.
Mounts: ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: Orion: Little Giant II 15x70, WorldView 10x50, Nikon: Action EX 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68s; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV; Russell Optics: SuperPlossls.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS silver mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: Positive lock prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S; Astronomik: UHC, Orion: UltraBlock, SkyGlow.
Observing: DSOs: 2106 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 1635, S110: 77). Doubles: 1441, Comets: 18, Asteroids: 95
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#13

Post by kt4hx »

Bigzmey wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 4:42 am
kt4hx wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 3:27 am
Bigzmey wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 2:42 am Excellent session Alan! Shoveling snow and braving cold to catch some galaxies, that's the spirit! Looking for more reports like that from you.
Thanks Andrey. You may be thinking better him than me, as far as the shoveling snow and standing/sitting out in the cold though! :lol: As I said before, a few folks might consider me crazy! I just see it as being motivated, though perhaps to a fault. :)
Yep, better you than me. :) I close my desert camp when the temps get close to freezing at night. I would do a night or two at the backyard, but only if it is a warmer night :lol:

Still admire your drive.
Well, the forecast for over there is for 3 to 5 more inches of snow Sat night. Sunday night is to be clear with a low of 12°. We shall see....... :Think:
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#14

Post by Ylem »

Nice report Alan ☺️
I also got cold 🥶 reading it 😅
Clear Skies,
-Jeff :telescopewink:

Orion 127 Mak, ST80
Celestron Celestar
8SE, C6, C90 Mak
Coronado PST
A big box of Plossls
Little box of filters :D
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#15

Post by kt4hx »

Ylem wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 5:22 am Nice report Alan ☺️
I also got cold 🥶 reading it 😅
Thanks Jeff, glad you enjoyed freezing along with me. :)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#16

Post by bobharmony »

A very nice haul of galaxies, Alan! And all of that after shoveling out the space. Well done indeed.

I shoveled off the deck two days ago in anticipation of a night of imaging, but that hasn't happened yet and looks like it won't for the next few days. It does look like I'll get more chances to shovel in these next days, however. Time for a nap!

Bob
Hardware: Celestron C6-N w/ Advanced GTmount, Baader MK iii CC, Orion ST-80, Canon 60D (unmodded), Nikon D5300 (modded), Orion SSAG
Software: BYE, APT, PHD2, DSS, PhotoShop CC 2020, StarTools, Cartes du Ciel, AstroTortilla

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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#17

Post by kt4hx »

bobharmony wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 3:50 pm A very nice haul of galaxies, Alan! And all of that after shoveling out the space. Well done indeed.

I shoveled off the deck two days ago in anticipation of a night of imaging, but that hasn't happened yet and looks like it won't for the next few days. It does look like I'll get more chances to shovel in these next days, however. Time for a nap!

Bob
Thank you Bob. I admit, in the past I would never typically fight with the snow so I could bring the scope out. But it seems this winter I am more inclined to do so. I guess that is the allure of the darker skies. :)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#18

Post by helicon »

I don't think anyone will ever top you Alan in observing galaxies. You must be one of the best galaxy observers in the world and I'm not really kidding. Maybe you should try to get a book deal.
-Michael
Various scopes, 10" Zhumell Dob f/4.9, ES AR152 f/6.5, AWB 5.1" Onesky newt, Oberwerk 25x100 binos, two eyeballs. Camera: ZWO ASI 120
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#19

Post by kt4hx »

helicon wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 5:19 pm I don't think anyone will ever top you Alan in observing galaxies. You must be one of the best galaxy observers in the world and I'm not really kidding. Maybe you should try to get a book deal.
I truly appreciate your kind comments Michael. From my optic there are plenty of others who far exceed my skill level, such as Steve Gottlieb, Uwe Glahn and Alvin Huey, to name but a few. Their level of expertise is something to which I aspire. I try to use each observing opportunity as a means to learn more and increase my skills. While my age is working against my optical acuity, and I have seen it decline, I still think I do pretty good. :)
Alan

Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
ES AR127 f/6.5 & ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II || Apertura 6" f/5 Newtonian on Twilight-I
TV Ethos 100° 21mm, 13mm || ES 82° 24mm, 18mm || Vixen LVW 65° 22mm
Pentax XW 70° 10mm, 7mm, 5mm || barlows
DGM NPB Filter || Orion Ultra Block, O-III and Sky Glow Filters || Baader HaB Filter
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Astronomers, we look into the past to see our future." (me)
"What we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean." (Sir Isaac Newton)
"The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me...." (Blaise Pascal)
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Re: Observing Report for 03 February 2021 - no brass monkeys were harmed during the making of this report

#20

Post by NGC 1365 »

Never heard the term before, had to look it up-LOL. Thanks for sharing Alan.
Ivan
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