Canon 10X30 IS II

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John Baars
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Canon 10X30 IS II

#1

Post by John Baars »

P1010676 - kopie (1280x961).jpg
At the Dutch Forum, which I sometimes visit:-), I saw a fellow observer about my age with an enthusiastic report about the stabilized 10X30 Canon. I knew that such a stabilized instrument is very successful. I once had a used Fujinon Technostabi 14X40 (sold it again to buy a 102mm Vixen refractor) and it worked great. It only weighed a ton. At least it felt that way. I found it not easy to handle.

When I read the experiences of my older fellow observer, I became a little more enthusiastic. The 10X30 Canon would only weigh 600 grams, 400 grams less than my standard 10X50 Jenoptem. His hand-held observations spoke for themselves. Jupiter as a sphere, Albireo easily handheld separated , the three Auriga clusters, double in Perseus, all very beautiful. Thanks to this instrument, he enjoyed the almost still images of his youth again.

When I read this report I was persuaded.
http://www.scopeviews.co.uk/Canon10x30IS.htm

I sold some older stuff, including an older digital camera and a vintage 8X30 Zeiss binoculars, had to save up for a few more months, but then I was there. No, it's not cheap.

On daytime objects, the difference is striking and surprising. Details that are normally lost in the trembling of the hands suddenly become visible. I can well imagine that from now on I will take him into the wild.
Last night some open patches of sky peeped through the high and low clouds. Jupiter becomes a sphere that hangs almost still in space, moons clearly visible next to it. I can see the same in a standard 10X50, but then everything dances through the field of view. No strange outliers of light from the Jupiter sphere.

On stars the difference is also clear. Without stabilization I saw some hints of individual stars in the triangle of Vega, with stabilization everything calmed down and suddenly several small stars became clearly visible. Like you can switch those little stars on and off. Albireo, who I had never seen separated while I was standing upright with hand held low magnification binos (too much dancing), was separated nicely. A tiny point of light that hung flat and calmly against the main tiny point. Impressive.

Because of the clouds I have not been able to use it on more difficult objects yet. For fainter deep sky objects the aperture is of course a bit too small and I have yet to see how he will treat me to M42. After all It is not a 50 or 70mm instrument. However, I already know that it will compete with my standard 10X50 binoculars. Day and night.

Update: This evening it was better than yesterday. I could make out M13, M15, M27, M103. NGC457 showed the two main stars only. The limit was at magnitude 8.7 So M57 was not seen. The double cluster was beautiful, almost telescope- like. The big Perseus cluster, Mel 20, was breathtaking. A real telescope-like view, but with a 6 degree field. This calmness of the field of vision is definitely an added dimension. Serene.
I can't wait to see the Hyades and Pleiades!
Telescopes in Schiedam in frequency of use : *grabngo: SW 102 Maksutov F/13, *SW Evostar 120ED F/7.5, * SW 150mm Achromat F/5, *Vixen 102ED F/9, *OMC140 Maksutov F/14.3, on Vixen GPDX.
Most used Eyepieces: *Morpheus 14, *Panoptic 24, *Leica ASPH zoom, *Zeiss barlow, *Pentax XO5.
Most often used binoculars: *AusJena 10X50 Jenoptem, *Swarovski Habicht 7X42, * Canon 10X30 IS,* Celestron Skymaster 15X70, *Kasai 2.3X40

Rijswijk Observatory Foundation telescopes: * Astro-Physics Starfire 130 f/8 on NEQ6, * 6 inch Newton on GP, * C8
on NEQ6, * Meade 14 inch SCT on EQ8, *Lunt.

Amateur since 1970.
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Bigzmey
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Re: Canon 10X30 IS II

#2

Post by Bigzmey »

Congrats on new binos and first light John! I have been thinking on and off about IS binos, but always got spooked by weight and price.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102 ED F7; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD F10, 8" SCT F10, Omni XLT 150R Achro F5, Onyx 80ED F6.3; Meade: 80ST Achro F5.
Mounts: SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; iOptron: AZMP; ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; UA: MicroStar; Farpoint: UBM.
Binos: Celestron (Vixen) Giant 20x80; Orion: Binoviewers, Little Giant II 15x70, WorldView 10x50, Nikon: Action EX 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & 2xXFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68, 62; Vixen: 2xSLVs; Baader: 2xBCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV, Meade: Plossls.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS silver mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric; AltairAstro: Positive lock prism.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S, 6-color set; Astronomik: UHC, Orion: UltraBlock.
Observing: DSOs: 2385 (Completed: Messier, Herschel 1, 2, 3. In progress: H2,500: 1888, S110: 77). Doubles: 1494, Comets: 21, Asteroids: 98
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Re: Canon 10X30 IS II

#3

Post by Graeme1858 »

Great report John, I'm a bit late finding it!

The clarity of view sounds impressive.

Looking forward to your report of your views of the Hyades and Pleiades!

Regards

Graeme
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DeanD
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Re: Canon 10X30 IS II

#4

Post by DeanD »

Thanks for this John. I had a play with the first generation ones a few years back, and I was impressed not only with the stabilisation, but the optics: very sharp across the field and very little CA.

I hope they are going well for you.

All the best,

Dean
Telescopes: 12" f5 dob, Celestron CPC800, 150mmf5 Celestron achro, Tak TSA102, TV76, ETX125...
Binos: Steiner Wildlife XP 10x26, Swarovski 8x30 Habicht, Vanguard Endeavour 10.5x45, Fuji FMTR-SX 10x50, Tak 22x60, Orion Resolux 15x70
Eyepieces: way too many (is that possible?), but I do like my TV 32mm plossl, 13mm Nagler T6, 27mm Panoptic and 3-6mm Nagler zoom, plus Fujiyama 18mm and 25mm orthos and Tak 7.5mm LE
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Re: Canon 10X30 IS II

#5

Post by notFritzArgelander »

Very interesting!
Scopes: Refs: Orion ST80, SV 80EDA f7, TS 102ED f11 Newts: Z12 f5; Cats: VMC110L, Intes MK66,VMC200L f9.75 EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, Plossl 32-8mm. Mixed brand Masuyama/Astroplans Binoculars: Nikon Aculon 10x50, Celestron 15x70, Baader Maxbright. Mounts: Star Seeker III, Vixen Porta II, Celestron CG5, Orion Sirius EQG
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John Baars
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Re: Canon 10X30 IS II

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Post by John Baars »

Last night I was out for a while. It turned out to be a bit clear. So for a moment (through the glass of the garden door, because brrr cold outside) I looked at the Orion Nebula, the three belt stars in Orion and Sirius. Breathtaking, the return of the majestical Orion. My 10X50 could only penetrate deeper in the universe than the 10X30 IS when I pressed it against the glass of the door. More or less stabilized.

Off the cuff, they were actually a match, except that the image in the 10X30 was much more stable and therefore more enjoyable. I must confess that I have not done extensive research into the haze in M42 itself, there was too much fog in the air for such thing. I estimate that lying in a garden chair with the 10X50 will get you a fraction deeper. But it won't make much difference.

When I put them away and stepped in my bed again I heard a squeaky voice say: "that's not fair because you is big and I is small". "Your image is calmer" I heard a lower voice answer. It seems like I was dreaming already.

However, it is mainly the serenity with which the object hangs in the scene that stays with you. Even when dreaming.
Telescopes in Schiedam in frequency of use : *grabngo: SW 102 Maksutov F/13, *SW Evostar 120ED F/7.5, * SW 150mm Achromat F/5, *Vixen 102ED F/9, *OMC140 Maksutov F/14.3, on Vixen GPDX.
Most used Eyepieces: *Morpheus 14, *Panoptic 24, *Leica ASPH zoom, *Zeiss barlow, *Pentax XO5.
Most often used binoculars: *AusJena 10X50 Jenoptem, *Swarovski Habicht 7X42, * Canon 10X30 IS,* Celestron Skymaster 15X70, *Kasai 2.3X40

Rijswijk Observatory Foundation telescopes: * Astro-Physics Starfire 130 f/8 on NEQ6, * 6 inch Newton on GP, * C8
on NEQ6, * Meade 14 inch SCT on EQ8, *Lunt.

Amateur since 1970.
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The Happy Parrot
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Re: Canon 10X30 IS II

#7

Post by The Happy Parrot »

Nice review, John. Having the steadiness and time to observe calmly is priceless.
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