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starguru
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#41

Post by starguru »

Bigzmey wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 9:30 pm
starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:41 pm
Would an explore scientific 152mm with EQ mount and sorted peripherals for $1100 used be a good deal?
I have 150mm refractor and 8" SCT. Both are great scopes, but if I would be limited to just one scope, that would be 8" SCT.
This is helpful but can you expound on why?
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Sky Tinker
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#42

Post by Sky Tinker »

starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 2:33 am
What telescopes would be perfect for what tasks? For amateur astronomers, I’m aware of planet viewing, DSO viewing, and maybe sun viewing if that’s different. As well as photography...what would be ideal for each of those tasks?
The planets are small, and most deep-sky objects are small, therefore higher magnifications are required to see them well. Observing the Sun is accomplished by a white-light filter(most cheaply and therefore most popular), a Herschel-wedge, or an h-Alpha filter.

In so far as photography, any telescope may be used. It's the mount for the telescope that is most important, depending(afocal, EAA, or prime-focus).
"Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy! Andromeda! Our origin, our destiny!" And so the boy was hooked, and for the rest of his natural life.

Alan

Apochromat: Takahashi FS-102 f/8 - Achromats: Meade "Polaris" 90mm f/10(flocked & blackened), Antares(GSO) 805 80mm f/6(flocked & blackened), Celestron(Synta) "AstroMaster" 70mm f/13(flocked & blackened), Sears(Towa) #4-6340 50mm f/12(flocked & blackened) - Newtonians: Orion(Synta) 6" f/5(flocked & blackened), Meade "Polaris" 114mm f/8, Zhumell(GSO) Z100 100mm f/4 - Catadioptrics: Explore Scientific(JOC) 127mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain, Celestron "PowerSeeker" 127mm f/8 "Bird Jones" reflector(modified, flocked, blackened...& collimated!)...and mounts, eyepieces, barlows and diagonals.
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#43

Post by JayTee »

Please go back and read post number 23, The end of line 1 and the beginning of line 2. This recommendation has been suggested by many others. You can't go wrong with this scope.

JT
∞ Scopes: Celestron CPC1100 #2 Scope: 8" f/7.5 Dob AP Scopes: TPO 6" f/9 RC, ES 80mm f/6 APO G&G Scopes: Meade 102mm f/7.8, Bresser 102mm f/4.5 Guide Scopes: 70 & 80mm fracs
∞ Mounts: iOptron CEM60, Celestron AVX, SLT & GT (Alt-Az), Meade DS2000
∞ Cameras: Canon T3i (x2), ZWO ASI294MC Pro & 120MC, Orion SSAG
∞ Binos: 10X50,10.5X70,15X70², 25X100
∞ EPs: ES: 21 100°, 30 82° X-Cels: 9, 12, 18, 25 GSO:15,20
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I never met a scope I didn't want to keep. "My God, it's full of stars." Searching the skies since 1966!
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#44

Post by Sky Tinker »

Users have reported stability problems with the OTA of the 8SE. All you have to do is to see just how undermounted the telescope is within this image...

https://i.imgur.com/uvDLiVC.jpg

Now, the eye and brain can deal with the shakes and wobbles, but a camera cannot, and Schmidts and cameras are oft combined during the course of ownership. The SE mount is fine for the 6" Schmidt.

Rather, these mounts offer improved support...

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/ ... 78QAvD_BwE

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/ ... grain.html

There is this option as well; à la carte...

https://www.highpointscientific.com/cel ... -91020-xlt
https://www.highpointscientific.com/exp ... qAQAvD_BwE
Last edited by Sky Tinker on Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy! Andromeda! Our origin, our destiny!" And so the boy was hooked, and for the rest of his natural life.

Alan

Apochromat: Takahashi FS-102 f/8 - Achromats: Meade "Polaris" 90mm f/10(flocked & blackened), Antares(GSO) 805 80mm f/6(flocked & blackened), Celestron(Synta) "AstroMaster" 70mm f/13(flocked & blackened), Sears(Towa) #4-6340 50mm f/12(flocked & blackened) - Newtonians: Orion(Synta) 6" f/5(flocked & blackened), Meade "Polaris" 114mm f/8, Zhumell(GSO) Z100 100mm f/4 - Catadioptrics: Explore Scientific(JOC) 127mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain, Celestron "PowerSeeker" 127mm f/8 "Bird Jones" reflector(modified, flocked, blackened...& collimated!)...and mounts, eyepieces, barlows and diagonals.
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#45

Post by helicon »

I have the ES AR152 - a 6" f/6.5 achromat as you mention. It is good for deep sky objects. I also find it offers better views of the moon and planets than my 10" Dob. I have an alt-azimuth mount - the Twilight II. I bought the mount new from B&H Photo, the scope I bought used for about $450 as I recall. Altogether the cost was $900 or so.
scope.jpg
-Michael
Various scopes, 10" Zhumell Dob, ES AR152, AWB 5.1" Onesky newt, Oberwerk 25x100 binos, two eyeballs
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Bigzmey
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#46

Post by Bigzmey »

starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:17 pm
Bigzmey wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 9:30 pm
starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:41 pm
Would an explore scientific 152mm with EQ mount and sorted peripherals for $1100 used be a good deal?
I have 150mm refractor and 8" SCT. Both are great scopes, but if I would be limited to just one scope, that would be 8" SCT.
This is helpful but can you expound on why?
I mount and use these two scopes side by side, so had plenty occasions to compare them. 8" SCT show more details in planets and galaxies. It also reaches deeper and show fainter stars and galaxies,which you can't resolve with 150mm refractor. But refractor has an edge over 8" SCT on large targets open clusters and nebulae because it has wider field of view.

Using them in parallel I utilize advantages od both, but for single use I always pick SCT.

SCT is also about half the weight of 150mm frac and can be used on lighter mounts like TW1. It is true grab and go setup. 150mm require heavier mount.
Last edited by Bigzmey on Sat Jan 04, 2020 11:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102 ED F7; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD F10, 8" SCT F10, 6" SCT F10, Omni XLT 150R Achro F5, Onyx 80ED F6.3; Meade: 80ST Achro F5.
Mounts: ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: Orion: Little Giant II 15x70, WorldView 10x50, Nikon: Action EX 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68s; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV; Russell Optics: SuperPlossls.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS silver mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S; Astronomik: UHC, Orion: UltraBlock, SkyGlow.
Observing: DSOs: 1763 (Completed: M110, H1, H2. In progress: H3: 259, H2,500: 1336, S110: 77). Doubles: 1304, Comets: 15, Asteroids: 75
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#47

Post by starguru »

Sky Tinker wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:48 pm
Users have reported stability problems with the OTA of the 8SE. All you have to do is to see just how undermounted the telescope is within this image...

https://i.imgur.com/uvDLiVC.jpg

Now, the eye and brain can deal with the shakes and wobbles, but a camera cannot, and Schmidts and cameras are oft combined during the course of ownership. The SE mount is fine for the 6" Schmidt.

Rather, these mounts offer improved support...

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/ ... 78QAvD_BwE


https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/ ... grain.html
Two things:

1. The second option is the one recommended to me by the folks at high point. I've read mixed reviews of the mount.
2. What would the difference between these 2 be? The are both 8" SCTs by Celeron. Is there a reason to prefer one to the other?
The idea of going a la carte appeals to me, particularly if buying the mount separately gives me more options in the future. Is there any reason this mount is superior to the ones offered in the bundles?

Thanks for the discussion and help.
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#48

Post by starguru »

helicon wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:57 pm
I have the ES AR152 - a 6" f/6.5 achromat as you mention. It is good for deep sky objects. I also find it offers better views of the moon and planets than my 10" Dob. I have an alt-azimuth mount - the Twilight II. I bought the mount new from B&H Photo, the scope I bought used for about $450 as I recall. Altogether the cost was $900 or so.

scope.jpg
How do you like it? Dang $450!! They are $950 new now....
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Sky Tinker
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#49

Post by Sky Tinker »

helicon wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:57 pm
I also find it offers better views of the moon and planets than my 10" Dob.
The diffraction-effects of a Newtonian do muck up the image a bit. Jupiter through my 6" f/5...
101915 - Jupiter flares.jpg
101915 - Jupiter flares.jpg (8 KiB) Viewed 433 times
Even at the higher powers I can still see them. I then integrated a variable-polariser, and the effects vanished; the subtle colouring of the planet's surface was revealed, and a glorious yet brief sighting of the festoons and whorls within the planet's equatorial-bands was made manifest. The image was dimmer, of course, but that's the price you pay. Regrettably, no afocal image of that was possible at the time.

Mars, and during its last opposition...
Mars - 061118.jpg
Mars - 061118.jpg (5.36 KiB) Viewed 433 times
...then, again, the variable-polariser...
Mars - 061118 - vp.jpg
Mars - 061118 - vp.jpg (4.02 KiB) Viewed 433 times
The detection of chromatic-aberration does vary from individual to individual when viewing brighter objects with a fast-achromat. As we age, the effect is less noticeable; a consolation I suppose. Others integrate minus-violet, fringe-killer, and even #8 and #12 yellow filters to reduce the appearance of false-colour; but the aberration is still present, in full force, which degrades the image nonetheless. The aberration of a 152mm f/6.5 achromat is worse than that of a 102mm f/6.5 achromat; and certainly has to be worse than that of my 80mm f/6 achromat. You can't get past the ole physics in that I'm afraid...

https://i.imgur.com/jDIHkcv.jpg

https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/2922 ... ge-killer/
https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/3015 ... refractor/

On the plus side, refractors aren't a mile long anymore...

https://i.imgur.com/d3PWHl2.jpg
"Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy! Andromeda! Our origin, our destiny!" And so the boy was hooked, and for the rest of his natural life.

Alan

Apochromat: Takahashi FS-102 f/8 - Achromats: Meade "Polaris" 90mm f/10(flocked & blackened), Antares(GSO) 805 80mm f/6(flocked & blackened), Celestron(Synta) "AstroMaster" 70mm f/13(flocked & blackened), Sears(Towa) #4-6340 50mm f/12(flocked & blackened) - Newtonians: Orion(Synta) 6" f/5(flocked & blackened), Meade "Polaris" 114mm f/8, Zhumell(GSO) Z100 100mm f/4 - Catadioptrics: Explore Scientific(JOC) 127mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain, Celestron "PowerSeeker" 127mm f/8 "Bird Jones" reflector(modified, flocked, blackened...& collimated!)...and mounts, eyepieces, barlows and diagonals.
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#50

Post by starguru »

Cool images! I am aware of the CA consequence of achromatic refractors. In the earlier posts many recomm them for starting out.

Do you have any examples of what proper targets for refractors look like?

Also, I see in your sig you have an APO piece, how does that do?
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#51

Post by JayTee »

Do you have any examples of what proper targets for refractors look like?
Any target that will fit in the field of view!!!

Okay, it's time:

You have several examples of some great systems to consider as your first telescope. Most of these suggestions will give you an 80 - 90% solution. You will NOT get a 100% solution from this post because we are NOT you! Just remember that when you started this thread you were at a 0.00% solution so your knowledge has come a long way.

It is time for you to put your stake in the sand! Now go out there and conquer. We will still be here to support you after you have received your new scope!

Just do it,
JT
∞ Scopes: Celestron CPC1100 #2 Scope: 8" f/7.5 Dob AP Scopes: TPO 6" f/9 RC, ES 80mm f/6 APO G&G Scopes: Meade 102mm f/7.8, Bresser 102mm f/4.5 Guide Scopes: 70 & 80mm fracs
∞ Mounts: iOptron CEM60, Celestron AVX, SLT & GT (Alt-Az), Meade DS2000
∞ Cameras: Canon T3i (x2), ZWO ASI294MC Pro & 120MC, Orion SSAG
∞ Binos: 10X50,10.5X70,15X70², 25X100
∞ EPs: ES: 21 100°, 30 82° X-Cels: 9, 12, 18, 25 GSO:15,20
Home Wx (click)

I never met a scope I didn't want to keep. "My God, it's full of stars." Searching the skies since 1966!
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Sky Tinker
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#52

Post by Sky Tinker »

starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 11:23 pm
Sky Tinker wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:48 pm
Users have reported stability problems with the OTA of the 8SE. All you have to do is to see just how undermounted the telescope is within this image...

https://i.imgur.com/uvDLiVC.jpg

Now, the eye and brain can deal with the shakes and wobbles, but a camera cannot, and Schmidts and cameras are oft combined during the course of ownership. The SE mount is fine for the 6" Schmidt.

Rather, these mounts offer improved support...

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/ ... 78QAvD_BwE


https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/ ... grain.html
Two things:

1. The second option is the one recommended to me by the folks at high point. I've read mixed reviews of the mount.
2. What would the difference between these 2 be? The are both 8" SCTs by Celeron. Is there a reason to prefer one to the other?
The idea of going a la carte appeals to me, particularly if buying the mount separately gives me more options in the future. Is there any reason this mount is superior to the ones offered in the bundles?

Thanks for the discussion and help.
1. I must admit, I would never purchase an AVX for myself, although it does have a lot of bells and whistles; computerised and electronic aspects to aid in astrophotography. My beef is with the physical mechanics of the mount; the parts made of metal; of course, an aversion to plastic parts is a given. One thing is that the DEC-axis uses a simple flat-washer for its bearing. Users have reported the axis sticking as a result. In addition, you can't hyper-tune the mount yourself; that is, taking something made in China and transforming it into something made in Japan instead.
2. No difference; Synta simply decorates them differently. Also, some come with CG5 dovetail-bars(Vixen), and others with the CGE type(Losmandy). You'd want the CG5(Vixen) type bar. This OTA however provides considerably sharper views...

https://www.highpointscientific.com/cel ... -91031-xlt

...HD(High Definition), but for a price.

In so far as the mounts, I believe that the Explore Scientific would be a better value over the Celestron AVX; and it's cheaper to boot, the reason being that Explore Scientific is a relatively "new kid on the block" compared to the other brands. It has ball-bearings for both axes. However, your best bet is to pore over user-reviews throughout the internet about this mount and that before finally deciding. High-dollar purchases such as these require, no, demand, intense scrutiny online, and for perhaps a week or more. You do want to get your money's worth. Don't rush into anything at present.

Incidentally, what did you not like about the classical-Cassegrains?
Last edited by Sky Tinker on Sun Jan 05, 2020 12:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy! Andromeda! Our origin, our destiny!" And so the boy was hooked, and for the rest of his natural life.

Alan

Apochromat: Takahashi FS-102 f/8 - Achromats: Meade "Polaris" 90mm f/10(flocked & blackened), Antares(GSO) 805 80mm f/6(flocked & blackened), Celestron(Synta) "AstroMaster" 70mm f/13(flocked & blackened), Sears(Towa) #4-6340 50mm f/12(flocked & blackened) - Newtonians: Orion(Synta) 6" f/5(flocked & blackened), Meade "Polaris" 114mm f/8, Zhumell(GSO) Z100 100mm f/4 - Catadioptrics: Explore Scientific(JOC) 127mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain, Celestron "PowerSeeker" 127mm f/8 "Bird Jones" reflector(modified, flocked, blackened...& collimated!)...and mounts, eyepieces, barlows and diagonals.
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#53

Post by starguru »

JayTee wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 12:30 am
Do you have any examples of what proper targets for refractors look like?
Any target that will fit in the field of view!!!

Okay, it's time:

You have several examples of some great systems to consider as your first telescope. Most of these suggestions will give you an 80 - 90% solution. You will NOT get a 100% solution from this post because we are NOT you! Just remember that when you started this thread you were at a 0.00% solution so your knowledge has come a long way.

It is time for you to put your stake in the sand! Now go out there and conquer. We will still be here to support you after you have received your new scope!

Just do it,
JT
Yes I appreciate your patience in this discussion. I’m pretty sure I’ll go some sort of SCT.

I’m held up on which one, and whether to do with package, or a la Carte.
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Refractordude
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#54

Post by Refractordude »

Sky Tinker wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:16 pm
starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:41 pm
Would an explore scientific 152mm with EQ mount and sorted peripherals for $1100 used be a good deal?
That 152mm f/6.5 achromat would exhibit quite a bit of false-colour when viewing brighter objects, like the planets, and the brighter single and double stars. It's an ideal for the dimmer deep-sky objects however.
all he has to do is add a 102mm aperture mask, and turn the f/6.5 into a f/10. 102mm aperture is sufficient for the bright moon and planets.
Telescopes: Meade LX70 120mm f/8 Refractor, Vixen 70mm f/12.9 Refractor, Tasco 49N 50mm Red Refractor
Binoculars: Zhumell 20x80 Giant, Levenhuk Sherman 7x50
Mounts: Orion SkyView Pro Equatorial, Orion Versago II Altazimuth, Farpoint Universal Parrallogram Mount
Finders: GSO 8x50 Raci, Svbony Red Dot
Diagonals: GSO Dielectric 2", GSO Dielectric 1.25"
Eyepieces: GSO Plossls 32mm/25mm/20mm, GSO 20mm Superview, Svbony 20mm/15mm/9mm/6mm, Svbony Aspheric 23mm/10mm/4mm, Agena Super Wide Angle 15mm, Few No Name Brand Ebay Plossls
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Sky Tinker
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#55

Post by Sky Tinker »

Refractordude wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 2:13 am
Sky Tinker wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:16 pm
starguru wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 8:41 pm
Would an explore scientific 152mm with EQ mount and sorted peripherals for $1100 used be a good deal?
That 152mm f/6.5 achromat would exhibit quite a bit of false-colour when viewing brighter objects, like the planets, and the brighter single and double stars. It's an ideal for the dimmer deep-sky objects however.
all he has to do is add a 102mm aperture mask, and turn the f/6.5 into a f/10. 102mm aperture is sufficient for the bright moon and planets.
There is that, yes, but then you would lose the increased resolution(detail) afforded by the full 6" of aperture. Still, that's a decent solution.
"Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy! Andromeda! Our origin, our destiny!" And so the boy was hooked, and for the rest of his natural life.

Alan

Apochromat: Takahashi FS-102 f/8 - Achromats: Meade "Polaris" 90mm f/10(flocked & blackened), Antares(GSO) 805 80mm f/6(flocked & blackened), Celestron(Synta) "AstroMaster" 70mm f/13(flocked & blackened), Sears(Towa) #4-6340 50mm f/12(flocked & blackened) - Newtonians: Orion(Synta) 6" f/5(flocked & blackened), Meade "Polaris" 114mm f/8, Zhumell(GSO) Z100 100mm f/4 - Catadioptrics: Explore Scientific(JOC) 127mm f/15 Maksutov-Cassegrain, Celestron "PowerSeeker" 127mm f/8 "Bird Jones" reflector(modified, flocked, blackened...& collimated!)...and mounts, eyepieces, barlows and diagonals.
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#56

Post by starguru »

Sky Tinker wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:48 pm
This OTA however provides considerably sharper views...

https://www.highpointscientific.com/cel ... -91031-xlt

...HD(High Definition), but for a price.

In so far as the mounts, I believe that the Explore Scientific would be a better value over the Celestron AVX; and it's cheaper to boot, the reason being that Explore Scientific is a relatively "new kid on the block" compared to the other brands. It has ball-bearings for both axes. However, your best bet is to pore over user-reviews throughout the internet about this mount and that before finally deciding. High-dollar purchases such as these require, no, demand, intense scrutiny online, and for perhaps a week or more. You do want to get your money's worth. Don't rush into anything at present.

Incidentally, what did you not like about the classical-Cassegrains?
Ill check out that HD SCT.

Im still doing research on the classical Cassegrain. From the link you provided it seems like all benefits and no draw backs, but I know that can't be true, so I'm just trying to learn more.
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Bigzmey
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#57

Post by Bigzmey »

starguru wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 12:56 am
JayTee wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 12:30 am
Do you have any examples of what proper targets for refractors look like?
Any target that will fit in the field of view!!!

Okay, it's time:

You have several examples of some great systems to consider as your first telescope. Most of these suggestions will give you an 80 - 90% solution. You will NOT get a 100% solution from this post because we are NOT you! Just remember that when you started this thread you were at a 0.00% solution so your knowledge has come a long way.

It is time for you to put your stake in the sand! Now go out there and conquer. We will still be here to support you after you have received your new scope!

Just do it,
JT
Yes I appreciate your patience in this discussion. I’m pretty sure I’ll go some sort of SCT.

I’m held up on which one, and whether to do with package, or a la Carte.
When you select the mount consider portability vs stability. Yes, the mount which comes in SE package is a bit shaky, but from what I gather is sufficient for visual observing. The advantage is that it makes together with 8" SCT lightweight and portable package. Same goes for the manual Twilight I mount I have suggested.

The heavier EQ mounts you are considering provide more stable platform and they will track better, but they weight much more. I had a very nice 5" APO refractor in the past. But due to it size and weight I had to operate it on heavier EQ mount. I liked the views, but setting it became a chore, and I often would skip it for smaller scope which I can grab and easily carry mounted. I end up selling the APO scope.

One of the reasons I am so enthusiastically advocating for 8" SCT that it is so lightweight but reaches so deep because of 8" aperture. Pairing it with lightweight mount like SE or TW1 will help to use it more often.

Finally, if you decide to buy the mount and scope separately, buy the orange tube OTA from HPS (link is in my post above). There is no reason to pay extra $200 for the black color. They are exactly the same.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102 ED F7; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD F10, 8" SCT F10, 6" SCT F10, Omni XLT 150R Achro F5, Onyx 80ED F6.3; Meade: 80ST Achro F5.
Mounts: ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: Orion: Little Giant II 15x70, WorldView 10x50, Nikon: Action EX 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68s; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV; Russell Optics: SuperPlossls.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS silver mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S; Astronomik: UHC, Orion: UltraBlock, SkyGlow.
Observing: DSOs: 1763 (Completed: M110, H1, H2. In progress: H3: 259, H2,500: 1336, S110: 77). Doubles: 1304, Comets: 15, Asteroids: 75
starguru
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#58

Post by starguru »

Sky Tinker wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 2:30 am
Refractordude wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 2:13 am
Sky Tinker wrote:
Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:16 pm


That 152mm f/6.5 achromat would exhibit quite a bit of false-colour when viewing brighter objects, like the planets, and the brighter single and double stars. It's an ideal for the dimmer deep-sky objects however.
all he has to do is add a 102mm aperture mask, and turn the f/6.5 into a f/10. 102mm aperture is sufficient for the bright moon and planets.
There is that, yes, but then you would lose the increased resolution(detail) afforded by the full 6" of aperture. Still, that's a decent solution.
Heh, exchanges like this make me more indecisive :).
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Bigzmey
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#59

Post by Bigzmey »

starguru wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 3:03 am
Sky Tinker wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 2:30 am
Refractordude wrote:
Sun Jan 05, 2020 2:13 am

all he has to do is add a 102mm aperture mask, and turn the f/6.5 into a f/10. 102mm aperture is sufficient for the bright moon and planets.
There is that, yes, but then you would lose the increased resolution(detail) afforded by the full 6" of aperture. Still, that's a decent solution.
Heh, exchanges like this make me more indecisive :).
You are reaching paralysis by analysis state! :D As I mentioned before it took me a few scopes to get where I want to be. Chances are you may not like your first scope. Just don't buy something large which weigh a ton. You will loose a lot trying to resell or return.

150mm refractor or 8" SCT, both are main stream and easy to resell. 12" DOB or less known/popular designs (like classic Cassegorian) not so.
Scopes: Stellarvue: SV102 ED F7; Celestron: 9.25" EdgeHD F10, 8" SCT F10, 6" SCT F10, Omni XLT 150R Achro F5, Onyx 80ED F6.3; Meade: 80ST Achro F5.
Mounts: ES: Twilight I; Bresser: EXOS2; SW: SkyTee2, AzGTi; UA: MicroStar.
Binos: Orion: Little Giant II 15x70, WorldView 10x50, Nikon: Action EX 16x50 & 8x40.
EPs: Pentax: XWs & XFs; TeleVue: Delites, Panoptic & Plossls; ES: 68s; Vixen: SLVs; Baader: BCOs, Aspherics, Mark IV; Russell Optics: SuperPlossls.
Diagonals: Baader: BBHS silver mirror, Zeiss Spec T2 prism, Clicklock dielectric; TeleVue: Evebrite dielectric.
Filters: Lumicon: DeepSky, UHC, OIII, H-beta; Baader: Moon & SkyGlow, Contrast Booster, UHC-S; Astronomik: UHC, Orion: UltraBlock, SkyGlow.
Observing: DSOs: 1763 (Completed: M110, H1, H2. In progress: H3: 259, H2,500: 1336, S110: 77). Doubles: 1304, Comets: 15, Asteroids: 75
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JayTee
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#60

Post by JayTee »

GO
DO IT
GO
DO IT
GO
DO IT
GO
DO IT

Should I go on?

JT
∞ Scopes: Celestron CPC1100 #2 Scope: 8" f/7.5 Dob AP Scopes: TPO 6" f/9 RC, ES 80mm f/6 APO G&G Scopes: Meade 102mm f/7.8, Bresser 102mm f/4.5 Guide Scopes: 70 & 80mm fracs
∞ Mounts: iOptron CEM60, Celestron AVX, SLT & GT (Alt-Az), Meade DS2000
∞ Cameras: Canon T3i (x2), ZWO ASI294MC Pro & 120MC, Orion SSAG
∞ Binos: 10X50,10.5X70,15X70², 25X100
∞ EPs: ES: 21 100°, 30 82° X-Cels: 9, 12, 18, 25 GSO:15,20
Home Wx (click)

I never met a scope I didn't want to keep. "My God, it's full of stars." Searching the skies since 1966!
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