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Aliens definitely exist and they could be living among us on Earth, says Britain's first astronaut

Discuss non-Astronomy related subjects.
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Aliens definitely exist and they could be living among us on Earth, says Britain's first astronaut

#1

Post by smp » Mon Jan 06, 2020 7:12 pm

From CNN:
"(CNN) - Aliens definitely exist, Britain's first astronaut has said -- and it's possible they're living among us on Earth but have gone undetected so far.
Helen Sharman, who visited the Soviet Mir space station in 1991, told the Observer newspaper on Sunday that 'aliens exist, there's no two ways about it.'"

This is going to be very helpful to the conversation, I'm sure.

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#2

Post by notFritzArgelander » Mon Jan 06, 2020 7:43 pm

Perhaps she could make a few introductions? ;)
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#3

Post by frazier » Mon Jan 06, 2020 7:54 pm

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Wasn't it Carl Sagan who said that?
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#4

Post by Star Dad » Mon Jan 06, 2020 9:15 pm

Yeah - hook me up with one. I mean she said they definitely exist. So introduce one to us. Methinks she is a space cadet having taken one too many happy pills.

Geeze - really?!? <sigh> :angry-tappingfoot: :face desk:
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#5

Post by Harmonious » Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:22 pm

James Irwin believed that on the moon he was in the presence of Jesus and later searched for the ark on Ararat.

Michael Collins said that he believes in the existence of aliens.

Edgar Mitchell allegedly tried to test for ESP and claimed some documented successes.

All that any of this shows is that even people with an engineering or science background can take a position that cannot be tested/falsified (aliens or god) or accept as evidence something that fails to meet normal test criteria.

How could one disprove the existence of aliens? it is rational to say that they might exist. But to say that because we exist here and now therefore there must be aliens somewhere, suggests to me that speaker skipped a class in logic.

We might sooner or later see conclusive proof that "aliens" exist, but right now it is fair to say that we may not prove or falsify the existence of extra-solar life during the remaining life of the universe.

Now back to the question we need to answer, how many angels...
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#6

Post by Bigzmey » Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:27 pm

Astronut - there, I have fixed it for you. :D
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#7

Post by Makuser » Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:33 pm

Hi all. I have a logical brain, but I am no match fot nFA. But if Helen did contact aliens who are so advanced:
1: Why didn't they tell us how to stop killing each other?
2: Why didn't they tell us how to increase crop production for some of the starving parts of our planet?
3: Why didn't they give us better renewable energy resources than we have now?
4: Why didn't they give us a communications link with their home base?
and
5: Where did they originate?
I think that Star Dad is right. Helen , an old has been, has been on mescaline or psilocybin for so long, that she no longer makes any sense.
Last edited by Makuser on Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#8

Post by AntennaGuy » Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:38 pm

This is what should be done: Carefully investigate and document the symptoms exhibited by these individuals, since it is important that we improve our understanding of the potential health hazards of space flight.
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#9

Post by Gfamily » Mon Jan 06, 2020 11:32 pm

We know that life started on Earth at most within a billion years of its creation, and quite possibly within a shorter period of time.
There is no a-priori reason to believe that there is anything exceptional about our planet with regard to allowing life to start here.
Given that life started here so readily, it is not unreasonable to expect that life should be capable of starting on any similarly positioned planet.

I think some people are reading far too much into Helen's comments.
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#10

Post by gregl » Tue Jan 07, 2020 4:34 am

I have proof that aliens exist. I have one for my congressman.
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#11

Post by Harmonious » Tue Jan 07, 2020 8:59 am

Gfamily wrote:
Mon Jan 06, 2020 11:32 pm
We know that life started on Earth at most within a billion years of its creation, and quite possibly within a shorter period of time.
There is no a-priori reason to believe that there is anything exceptional about our planet with regard to allowing life to start here.
Given that life started here so readily, it is not unreasonable to expect that life should be capable of starting on any similarly positioned planet.

I think some people are reading far too much into Helen's comments.
Yes it is not unreasonable. We have no reason to know that our situation is unique. You could even drop the qualifier and say life exists here so it may exist elsewhere. But that is speculative. You cannot reason from a single example to any general rule. That is neither good logic or good science.

How about this. Suppose that the speed of light is the speed limit and that interstellar travel is not ever practical. Suppose too that humanity is not unique and will like other species eventually go extinct. Suppose further that there have been, are and will be many extra solar civilizations. We are unlikely to know anything about them or they to know about us.

Bleak. Ok suppose that interstellar travel is possible and practical. Then we have to address the Fermi paradox.

It seems to me that speculating on the existence of alien life, is rather pointless. As pointless as denying the possibility.
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#12

Post by Harshil » Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:06 am

Aliens! There may be or may not be...Right now if we calculate the probability of that then we have 50-50 % chances of both possibilities...

There are theories that might be true like Fermi paradox (type 1, 2, 3 civilizations...Dyson sphere, stellar engine [aliens may more intelligence than us and have used these ideas or may not be, again 50-50% possibility :lol: ] lots of theories)

And if we want to prove these theories then we need very advanced technologies, space travel must need at speed of light that we don't have right now .... and if somehow we creat the ship that travels at speed of light then again the problem '' speed of light is not fast'' :( It takes 100,000 years to cross our galaxy and there are billions of galaxy exist :roll:

So, we have both possibilities ...But its a really interesting topic for astronomers...and I think that in this topic Kurzgesagt videos on youtube provide good information.
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#13

Post by notFritzArgelander » Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:21 am

Just to note that the best analysis of how long it takes the universe to produce technological species is about 13 billion years. The likelihood of another such in this galaxy is only 50-50, one or zero. There will be many more such in the future but not likely now.

One needs to estimate how long it takes the universe to make the first one. Just saying "Ooh, aah, lots of stars!" is meaningless.

viewtopic.php?f=28&t=5923

Particularly https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/ ... 11/1046202.

I haven't seen any rebuttal of this analysis.
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#14

Post by pakarinen » Tue Jan 07, 2020 2:08 pm

gregl wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 4:34 am
I have proof that aliens exist. I have one for my congressman.


Ummm, I think we're discussing aliens, not idiots.

I'm still impressed that they've mastered interstellar or interdimensional or time travel and still manage to crash their ships into the desert and elsewhere. :doh:
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#15

Post by Don Alvarez » Tue Jan 07, 2020 2:26 pm

notFritzArgelander wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:21 am
Just to note that the best analysis of how long it takes the universe to produce technological species is about 13 billion years. The likelihood of another such in this galaxy is only 50-50, one or zero. There will be many more such in the future but not likely now.

One needs to estimate how long it takes the universe to make the first one. Just saying "Ooh, aah, lots of stars!" is meaningless.

viewtopic.php?f=28&t=5923

Particularly https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/ ... 11/1046202.

I haven't seen any rebuttal of this analysis.
I shall rebut this analysis using the modern accepted techniques of internet discussion:



HOGWASH!


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#16

Post by notFritzArgelander » Tue Jan 07, 2020 2:42 pm

Don Alvarez wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 2:26 pm
notFritzArgelander wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:21 am
Just to note that the best analysis of how long it takes the universe to produce technological species is about 13 billion years. The likelihood of another such in this galaxy is only 50-50, one or zero. There will be many more such in the future but not likely now.

One needs to estimate how long it takes the universe to make the first one. Just saying "Ooh, aah, lots of stars!" is meaningless.

viewtopic.php?f=28&t=5923

Particularly https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/ ... 11/1046202.

I haven't seen any rebuttal of this analysis.
I shall rebut this analysis using the modern accepted techniques of internet discussion:



HOGWASH!


:D
:lol: YOU WIN!!! ;)
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#17

Post by AntennaGuy » Tue Jan 07, 2020 3:22 pm

Communication across interstellar space is very difficult, but it is nevertheless both faster and enormously easier than space travel. If there exist technologically advanced aliens in/around our galaxy, we will engage them in communications long before we meet them in person. And so far, we do not appear to have engaged them in communications. Thus the probability that aliens are currently visiting us is very close to zero.
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#18

Post by notFritzArgelander » Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:11 pm

notFritzArgelander wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 2:42 pm
Don Alvarez wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 2:26 pm
notFritzArgelander wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:21 am
Just to note that the best analysis of how long it takes the universe to produce technological species is about 13 billion years. The likelihood of another such in this galaxy is only 50-50, one or zero. There will be many more such in the future but not likely now.

One needs to estimate how long it takes the universe to make the first one. Just saying "Ooh, aah, lots of stars!" is meaningless.

viewtopic.php?f=28&t=5923

Particularly https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/ ... 11/1046202.

I haven't seen any rebuttal of this analysis.
I shall rebut this analysis using the modern accepted techniques of internet discussion:



HOGWASH!


:D
:lol: YOU WIN!!! ;)
It's so rare to see such impeccable logic backed up by reproducible data!
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#19

Post by Star Dad » Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:38 pm

Is there life in the universe outside of Earth? Well, sure. There might be life on Mars (if we'd only develop and send another set of probes to Mars. Intelligent life? I'd say probably. Aliens on Earth? ehhhhhhhh I don't think so. But to say that they are here so emphatically? Now we require proof.

I suspect many of the alien sightings out west were actually the B-1 bomber and/or F-117 while in test. But still, and I grant that it is possible for aliens on earth... but I want proof. mmm maybe 90 proof will do. :lol:
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#20

Post by Gfamily » Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:32 pm

Star Dad wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:38 pm
Is there life in the universe outside of Earth? Well, sure. There might be life on Mars (if we'd only develop and send another set of probes to Mars. Intelligent life? I'd say probably. Aliens on Earth? ehhhhhhhh I don't think so. But to say that they are here so emphatically? Now we require proof.
Helen Sharman did not emphatically say that they are here.
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